#riotsquad

20 fast facts on UK Prisons – sorry, No Vacancy

crs

Easy enough to find. Not enough space. Some fast facts on the state of prisons.

  1. UK prisons are at 96% (83,430) capacity (86,555) as of Friday, 25th May 2018. There are 3,125 available spaces left but 3,214 cases of home detention. 95% of inmates are male.
  2. A year ago (May 2017), capacity was 98.4% and 95% male population with around 2,100 in home detention.
  3. A prison is classified as overcrowded if the number of prisoners held exceeds the establishments Certified Normal Accommodation (CNA). As at the 30 December 2016, 69% (80) of prison establishments were overcrowded, 23 just over 10,000 more prisoners than the total in use CNA.
  4. Prison guards in the UK over the last decade have shrunk 30% from 25,000 to 17,500. The UK government announced in November 2016 that it plans to recruit 2,500 new front-line officers by 2018.
  5. In the 12 months to March 2017, there were 40,414 reported incidents of self-harm (a rate of 474 per 1,000 prisoners), up 17% on the previous year. The number of self-harm incidents requiring hospital attendance increased by 13% on the previous year to 2,771 while the proportion of incidents that required hospital attendance remains broadly similar at 6.9%.
  6. Self-harm trends differ considerably by gender, with a rate of 409 incidents per 1,000 in male establishments (with incidents up 24% on the previous year) compared to a rate of 1,835 per 1,000 in female establishments (a reduction of 8% in number of incidents from the previous year).
  7. Assaults continued to increase, reaching a record high of 26,643 assault incidents in the 12 months to March 2017, up 4,461 (20%) from the previous year. Of these, 3,606 were serious assaults, up 22% from the previous year.
  8. There were 19,361 prisoner-on-prisoner assaults in the 12 months to March 2017 (a rate of 227 per 1,000 prisoners), up 16% on the previous year. Of these, 2,825 were serious assaults, up 21% on the previous year.
  9. There were 7,159 assaults on staff in the 12 months to March 2017 (a rate of 84 per 1,000 prisoners), up 32% on the previous year. Of these, 805 were serious assaults, up 25% on the previous year.
  10. Deaths in prison have risen sharply in the last decade. Deaths per prisoner numbers are up 76%.  Other deaths (where cause has yet to be determined) up 833%. Absolute numbers are only 3.7 per 1,000 prisoners up from 2.1 a decade ago.
  11.  The National Tactical Response Group (NTRG) which is called under extreme levels of incidents has grown from 120 in 2010 to over 420 in the year to August 2016. Annualized that number would be close to 630. So almost 6-fold in only 6 years. In prison. Gold Command and Tornado teams are those where prison guards have specialist training.
  12. 25% of prison inmates are in for violence against others. 17% are in for sexual offences and 15% for theft and drug offences.
  13. The proportion of 30-39 year olds has increased by 4 percentage points to 30% since 2010. At the end of 2016 it was the most numerous age group of prisoners with over 25,000 in this age bracket. The proportion of prisoners aged over 40 has increased from 22% in 2005 to 33% in 2016.
  14. It is interesting to note that as of the 31 December 2016, there was one prisoner over the age of 100.
  15. At the end of 2016 just over a quarter of the prison population was from a non-white ethnic group – this figure has stayed relatively constant since 2005. Whites make up 87% of the UK population and 73% of inmates. Asian/Asian British make up 6.9% of the population and 8.0% of the inmates. Black/Black British make up 3% of the population and 12% of inmates.
  16. In June 2005, the largest ethnic groups in prison for British nationals were White (82%), Black/Black British (10%) and Asian/Asian British (4%).
  17. At the end of 2016 just under half the prison population was of a Christian faith (48.5%) – a decrease of 9.5% compared to June 2002. The proportion of Muslim prisoners has increased from 8% in 2002 to 15% in 2016. The proportion of prisoners with no religion in 2016 (31.5%) was down 0.9% compared to 2002. Hindu’s and Jews make up 0.5% each, Sikh 0.9% and Buddhist 1.8% of inmates. 
  18. At the end of 2016 there were just under 10,000 foreign nationals (FNP) within the prison population (c.12%). Foreign nationals from Europe accounted for the greatest proportion of all foreign nationals within the prison population (51%), those from Africa (19%) and Asia (16%) contributed the second and third largest proportion respectively.
  19. At the end of 2016, foreign nationals originating from the EU (excluding the UK) accounted for 43% of all foreign nationals in prison and just under 5% of the total prison population. Men accounted for 96% of all FNPs within the prison population.
  20. The available data for European countries in 2014 shows that Sweden
    and Norway spent £439/day per prisoner and £432/day per prisoner respectively. Figures for England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are all around £150 a day. Croatia spends a little over £9/day per prisoner.

What Australia’s authorities can learn from Germany’s extremist boom

8169EDE1-EFF5-4112-8799-2CAF43D3EB02.jpeg

Of course the easiest thing to do is label the Melbourne-based True Blue Crew (TBC) a bunch of racist bigots. It’s members view themselves as patriotic vigilantes. TBC is a group filling the void left wide open by the politically correct who in its mind are glossing over the things that matter to everyday Australians. One can debate their motives til the cows come home but growing numbers suggest that the political class is not responding. Germany is seeing a similar wave of vigilante behavior. Is it any wonder that Merkel is struggling to form a coalition with the surge in the AfD party to 14% of the vote. One Nation is at 10%. Notice a trend?

TBC, according to its Facebook page is planning to meet and then march through the streets of Melbourne to protest a “lack of action by the courts”  They have a point. An opinion piece in The Australian this week highlighted this leniency:

When it comes to sentencing, the courts take a sensitive approach. Ibrahim Kamara, from Sierra Leone, received a suspended sentence of just over one year, with an 18-month good ­behaviour order, after admitting to five counts, including grooming and having sex with a minor. The ACT Supreme Court judge said “(Kamara) has tried to make a good start on his life in Australia”.

In NSW, an Islamic sect leader was the first person in Australia to be imprisoned over the genital mutilation of two sisters aged six and seven. Notwithstanding a 21 years maximum, the leader ­received 11 months’ jail, while his two accessories will serve a minimum of 11 months’ home detention. This sets a derisory bench­mark for future sentencing….Judges have become politicians in robes and, like the police and other unelected authorities, selectively administer the law according to their prejudices.

Ironically, as much as the police and political class downplay the extent of  “African crime gangs”, “radical Islamic terrorism” or “FGM” the hardware suggests otherwise. We have “Public Order & Riot Squad” emblazoned across police cars in NSW and police officers are decked out in full para-military kit including M-4 automatic assault rifles, a superior weapon to that used by the Australian Infantry. These riot cars and machine guns didn’t exist 10 years ago. While we’re told all is well, the preventative materiel speaks volumes of the concerns within. The only problem is that the voting public is not that stupid that it doesn’t notice the hardware.

TBC also plans in the 2nd part [of the meeting] to take a stand on the streets which it claims “isn’t for the PC (politically correct) so keep that in mind. PC is not going to stop people’s houses being invaded, innocent people being attacked etc.”

Why are we surprised at such groups springing up? Germany’s Federal Ministry for the Interior (BfV) updated its factbook on the explosion in left and right wing groups and the rise of Salafists at home. To summarize:

In 2016, the BKA (Federal Criminal Police Office) registered 41,549 offences in the category of politically motivated crime, an increase of 29% over the 2014 figure.

Right wing extremist party membership has risen from 22,600 in 2015 to 23,100 in 2016.

1,600 (2015: 1,408) registered cases, the number of violent criminal offences with a right-wing extremist background increased by 13.6%. At 1,190, the number of violent crimes directed at foreigners (2015: 918) was the highest since the current definition of politically motivated crime was introduced in 2001. The number of violent crimes against actual or supposed left-wing extremists (250; 2015: 252) remained about the same. The number of violent offences against other political opponents fell significantly (34; 2015: 82).

Left wing extremist party membership has risen from 26,700 in 2015 to 28,500 in 2016.

In 2016, 5,230 criminal offences were classified as left-wing politically motivated crimes with an extremist background (2015: 5,620), of which 1,201 were violent crimes (2015: 1,608). The number of violent criminal offences with a left-wing extremist background that were directed against the police and security authorities significantly decreased to 687 (2015: 1,032) and is gradually returning to the level of 2014. The number of violent criminal offences against actual or supposed right-wing extremists also decreased to 542 (2015: 833). The number of violent crimes in the context of campaigns against restructuring more than tripled in 2016 (2015: 54, 2016: 188).

Islamic Extremists

Salafist movements in Germany have risen from 8,350 in 2015 to 9,700 in 2016 with the BfV noting on the whole, that all Islamist following in 2016 amounted to approximately 24,400 individuals, slightly down over 2015. BfV did note

Although this total number is smaller than in the previous years, the threat situation has not at all eased. On the contrary: the shift towards a violence-oriented/terrorist spectrum has revealed a new dimension of the Islamist scene, which was also illustrated by the attacks carried out in Germany in 2016However, Salafism in Germany enjoys undiminished popularity. Its continuous attractiveness shows the importance of Salafism being subject to a debate in society as a whole and of intelligence collection carried out by the community of the German domestic intelligence services. This is even more significant as adherents of the jihadist tendency of Salafism not only reject the West – symbolised by the free democratic basic order – but also actively fight against it: either by travelling to so-called jihad areas or by mounting attacks in the West.”

In the area of politically motivated crime by foreigners, 2,566 offences with an extremist background were registered (2015: 1,524), including 427 violent offences (2015: 235). The total number of criminal offences in this category thus increased by 68.4%, the number of violent crimes even by 81.7%. In 2016, there were two homicides and 13 attempted homicides by foreigners with an extremist background (2015: three).

Limp wristed rhetoric and responses (this town hall meeting in Germany is a good example) by officials is a large part of the problem for the rise of such groups. When people feel marginalized and ignored for long enough they will take matters into their own hands. It is not a question of whether groups like TBC are right or wrong in their approach to street justice but law enforcement risks having the problem blow up in their face because few in the political class are willing to tell it how it is.