That’s the retirement sorted then


I guess the brilliance of these scams is that the people who don’t respond can be eliminated and those that do can get gouged for what pittances they probably possess. How could one not fall for the impeccable qualities of Mrs Grace Innocent?

Crime in Japan – Yakuza, the Police and other crime


CM – Crime in Japan – Yakuza Police Other Crime

Once again, due to numerous requests see the above link for the full report and the summary below.

In our Crime in Japan series parts 1 & 2  we covered the jump in crime resulting from seniors breaking into prison and the rapid breakdown in the nuclear family leading to a surge in domestic violence and child abuse. In this report we cast our focus on the resources of the police and whether the change in crime is impacting their ability to hunt down Yakuza (gangsters), thwart drug use and possession, prevent murder and stop the leap in financial crime where insurance fraud alone is up 2,000% in 6 years and suspicious transactions breaking new records.

The Japanese National Police Agency (JNPA) has been the victim of budget cutbacks. Some 80% of the ¥3.2 trillion budget is spoken for by staff salaries. There are approximately 295,000 staff (including administration) but actual officer numbers have remained relatively stagnant at around 258,000. With an aging police force, retirees are putting pressure on hiring new recruits. Japan does have a low level of crime on a global basis and 197 police per 100,000 citizens reflects that.

Japan has budgeted approximately ¥232 billion to run its jails in 2016. The cost of incarceration runs to around ¥3.8mn per inmate which is around double what one could get through the welfare system. The theft of a ¥500 sandwich could lead to a ¥8mn tax bill to provide for a 2 year sentence. Courts are dealing out harsher sentences however drug related offences generally range inside 2 years behind bars. Many Japanese have been in the media crossfire for repeated drug offences and the courts have had no choice but to incarcerate them when ‘good behaviour’ probation periods have failed. Prison capacity has grown 50% in the last decade to meet the coming crime wave.

Drugs in Japan are an interesting topic. Meth was originally synthesised from ephedrine in 1893 by a Japanese chemist Dr. Nagayoshi Nagai. 26 years later, a pharmacologist by the name of Akira Ogata managed to turn it into crystalline form i.e. crystal meth.

When World War II got under way Japanese soldiers (especially kamikaze pilots) were given crystal meth (branded Hiropon) which not only kept them ‘wired’ but reduced hunger. As the war ended, Japan was left with excess supplies of Hiropon. Food supplies were few and returning soldiers added to the shortage. However little was known of the side effects and the government had an epidemic on its hands in the late 1940s. Luckily there is a solution being developed by the Japanese biotech company MediciNova (4875) which is in late stage trials in the US with a formula that weans drug users from their addiction.

One of the surprising statistics has been the trend in gangster (Yakuza) incarceration in Japan. While police have seen a surge in consultations (aka complaints) surrounding gangster activity, arrest rates have fallen by 30%. Is it because the police are so tied down by the surge in stalking, domestic violence, child abuse and larcenous geriatrics?

People with mental disabilities committing crime are also rising sharply, up 62% in the last decade. Apart from schizophrenia or medically diagnosed mental health issues, addiction to alcohol or substance abuse can also get an offender classified as mentally disable if they break the law.

Financial crime is becoming far more prevalent. From petty scams to sophisticated insurance and bank fraud, such offences are surging. Reported fraud related to bank transfers has doubled between 2010 and 2014 to 13,400 cases with the amount of money transacted surging 5-fold to ¥56.5bn.

Murder rates in Japan have remained relatively mute. The homicide rate in 2014 was 938 down from 1362 in 2006. As a ratio, Japan has 0.7 murders for 100,000 people versus 91 for Honduras (the highest) or 4.7 in the US. However Japan has not been immune to home grown massacres.

Foreigners as a percentage of crime in Japan continues its long downward march. Much of the crime is related to petty theft and visa overstays. Chinese, Vietnamese and Brazilians make up 60% of foreigner arrests in Japan. Foreigners as a percentage of inmates has also dropped sharply from 8% of the prison population to 5.5%. Chinese, Brazilians and Iranians make up half of gaijin inmates.

The incidence of crime continues to rise in Japan. As discussed in our previous reports we can see that crime rates (e.g. shoplifting, theft, child abuse, domestic violence, assault, stalking etc.), while small on a global scale, are rising at such a speed it seems to be taxing a police force struggling with worsening manpower issues. It would seem to make sense that despite growing reports of suspicious activity by organised crime, arrest rates are falling. Furthermore retiring demographics in the police force suggest that ‘street knowledge’ gained through decades of leads (e.g. informants) may not so easily be transferred to the new recruits. Throw financial fraud increasingly perpetrated by cyber criminals on top, perhaps the Police need to invest in sophisticated systems rather than just hire more cops on the beat? The face of crime has changed.


Why haven’t climate scientists been jailed for fraud?


Evil banksters have been burnt at the stake over the last 30 years. Some would argue that not enough of these swindlers saw the inside of a jail cell. Maybe. Still many have faced multi million dollar fines, two decade prison terms and barred from ever operating again in the financial industry. Yet time and again climate scientists who receive millions in funding to scare us with fraudulent reports never face any repercussions. In fact many end up suing for libel believing their reputations have been tarnished by exposutenof the truth.

In a sense the taxpayer money used to bailout the financial system is not much different from the billions being plowed recklessly into energy policy based on wonky research. Even government sponsored climate organizations (NOAA, NASA, BoM, UNIPCC) have fallen for the sins of huge grants and recycling updated bogus studies by fiddling previous data to keep their Ponzi scheme going. Junket travel has been a big feature in the recent exposures of NASA and BOM. Can’t be seen missing the conference in the Maldives!

So again, why haven’t any scientists “busted” for manipulating data been charged for fraud? If it is ok to send bankers to jail for white collar crimes, why not scientists? Because they can wrap their malfeasance inside models that are sold as well intentioned studies to saving the planet! Who can prove their did predictions might not come to pass?

WorldCom CEO Bernie Ebbers was sentenced to 25 years based on nine counts of conspiracy, securities fraud and false regulatory filings to the tune of $11bn. Enron’s former CEO Jeffrey Skilling was convicted on 35 counts of fraud, insider trading and other crimes related to Enron and sentenced to 24 years prison and fined $45 million. Madoff got 150 years, Stanford got 110 years jail time.

Will whistleblower scalps found guilty of fraud be charged, fined and jailed? It is highly unlikely. They’ll claim anomalies in data and forecasting is indeed difficult.

In any event if there was a Climate Science watchdog that monitored fraud (not to mention massive conflicts of interest which are mentioned in previous pieces) like the SEC how much fraud would scientists try to get away with? Why not have a body which mandates funding sources to check for potential conflicts of interest? That way dishonest scientists would be restricted in their movements and those with legitimate findings wouldn’t see their work drowned out by the rogue elements,

Interestingly most of the court related activities in the scientific fields have been exposed scientists looking to sue for libel after emails proving the fraud were leaked.

Yet scientists don’t have to worry. The media has little interest in chasing something that might ruin their narrative. Even worse they’ll cite scientists (Australia’s former climate commissioner Tim Flannery comes to mind) who have made countless dud predictions (in many cases the complete opposite has occurred ) and act as though it’s gospel.

Once again climate science is a religion. No wonder it’s got so much protection. Hence the vows of silence in the halls of the scientific church. They’re untouchable. However that by deduction makes me a heretic.

Why the broking industry doesn’t get it and the regulator gets it even less


I’ve had the opportunity to speak to numerous brokers in recent weeks and the sad fact remains much of the strategy is stuck in yesteryear. The idea that hiring more analysts and promoting a full deck colour brochure of their supposed ‘depth’ to clients is somehow more important than the content they can actually provide in a dumbed down compliance constrained world. The game has changed. The regulator has even less understanding than the brokers when it comes to understanding client needs. The buy-side investment community is also becoming highly resource constrained. To have to waste countless hours on admin to set a price on increasingly valueless research does them no favours.

Don’t be fooled by Smart Karma or Research Pool or any other 3rd party research aggregator. It is the same dumbed-down research bundled into a convenient pricing structure. I’ve looked into the economics and unless a research provider has a huge following the returns on contributing to these third party platforms is next to worthless. The more mouths to feed, the less return. On top of that the platform has no real control over what goes into it. It is a convenience store but in that vein, the nutritional value remains relatively low.

The simplest form of strategy is to set up ‘Special Forces’ type research teams. These teams don’t write rated research but charge on a ‘per mission’ basis. Take GLG. They have no broking license but carry out bespoke requests. Why aren’t brokers following this model? It is insane to hire more in sales, research and trading when the regulator is squeezing the traditional proposition to zero.

Two questions:

Did regulators actually ask smaller scale institutional  investors what they needed before they imposed rules which will dramatically increase their cost of doing business, the very opposite of the goal the regulator thinks its rules will create?

Are the traders of risk willing to take any risk to fill a gaping hole the very people they proclaim they serve are crying for?

What I see is more of the same. The bunker mentality. Conforming to outdated models to keep their inflated salaries alive for as long as possible pandering to internal politics to survive. Badgering clients to fill in irrelevant polls which serve no purpose but the promise of magical commission dollars in the future to their out of touch bosses at HQ. Some brokers even publish “the best of research” weeklies as a sort of self-appraised quality control mechanism to push on clients. Let’s think about that. If all research was properly screened before being published there would be no need to tell clients that this is the tiny fraction of research that isn’t (supposed) rubbish. It is actually confirming client’s worst fears – sell-side brokers aren’t listening  (as usual).

The gig is up. Regulators are even more clueless. Instead of trying to provide a marketplace where smaller boutiques can survive they drive the cost of compliance to such a degree that in many cases the teams of internal watchdogs swamps the investment decision makers. That’s right! The hottest ticket in finance is in compliance. A headhunter told me the network of compliance officers is so tight across firms there is almost a deliberate ‘insider’ matrix among them which encourages them all to switch firms to keep driving up their ‘collective’ remuneration. The people in charge of preventing scams are in fact the biggest operator of insider trading!

We’ve countless examples of how inept regulators are. Bernie Maddoff the biggest of them all. Despite multiple investigations and the clearest set of breaches presented to them they failed to uncover a $65bn fraud. Many regulators by background are lawyers meaning they are full of theory but devoid of real world practice. Regulators would be better off hiring convicted traders to hunt down fraud and illegal behaviour. As it stands they are as clueless as ever thinking more biting regulations will help the market. Wrong. Free it up but raise the penalties for actual wrong doing. I’ve never met an investor who doesn’t want to keep a useful broker alive. That’s why the payment skew is like it is. It isn’t just about Michelin 3-star meals and strip clubs. All the regulator has done is make an uncomplicated system almost unworkable. Although if brokers woke up to the fact that providing ‘special forces’ that clients directly requested and paid for they’d fill a gap which the regultor would have no answer to and make the iTunes research fintech companies obsolete overnight.

MiFID 2 will be the crowning glory of regulatory failure. MiFID 3 will be here before we know it as evidence of the catastrophic bungle it’s predecessor already is before it is in effect. Then again it is an EU directive – that ought to have told us something.