#domesticviolence

Domestic Violence & Child Abuse – a global issue

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Domestic violence and child abuse – inextricably linked to the breakdown of families. Two distasteful topics to be sure and the stats seem to be getting much worse. In 2015 authorities in the US recorded 3.4mn child abuse investigations from 3.1mn in 2011. For 2015, a nationally estimated 1,670 children died of abuse and neglect, mostly at the hands of their mothers. Alcohol, drug and other substance abuse has been a contributing factor. DV hotlines in America receive approximately 20,800 calls a day according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. In 2016, 57,335 URLs contained child sexual abuse imagery and 2,416 domain names worldwide were linked to this content. This is a 21% increase from 1,991 in 2015. Until recently, most child sexual abuse images were found in the US(57%), but Europe now hosts 60% of all material. 21,000 of these sites are run out of The Netherlands. Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) notes a 258% increase in new website domains being bought specifically to show the abuse of children.

Even in peace loving Japan, domestic violence (DV) has seen a very sharp upturn according to the National Police Agency this week. DV reached almost 70,000 recorded cases in 2016. Between 2010 and 2016, victims of DV have doubled and over 4x since 2005.  The Ministry for Health, Labor & Welfare (MHLW) has 208 child consultation centres which fielded over 88,000 cases in 2014, a 20.5%YoY increase or 22x the level of 20 years ago. Child pornography cases continue to rise in Japan too from 1,342 in 2010 to over 1,800 in 2014 . While a law was passed in July 2014 banning possession of child pornography, sentences only carry a maximum 1 year jail sentence or ¥1mn fine. Sexually explicit manga, anime and computer graphics which display child pornography are exempt because lawmakers view these as outside the scope of real children.

In Australia some 264,000 DV incidents were recorded in 2015.  In 2016–17, about 72,000 women, 34,000 children and 9,000 men seeking homelessness services reported that family and domestic violence caused or contributed to their homelessness according to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

The number of children receiving child protection services in Australia has risen by about 20% over the past 4 years—from 135,000 in 2012/13 to 162,000 in 2015/16. Nationally, emotional abuse was the most common primary type of abuse or neglect substantiated for children (45%), followed by neglect (25%), physical (18%) and sexual abuse (12%). Overall, just over half (51%) of children who were the subject of substantiations were girls (23,000 compared with 22,200 boys). Girls were almost twice as likely to have a substantiation recorded for sexual abuse than boys (16% compared with 8.5%). Boys had slightly higher rates of physical abuse, emotional abuse and neglect than girls (19% compared with 18%, 46% compared with 43%, and 26% compared with 23%, respectively.

According to the American Society of  Positive Care of Children (ASPCC), 14% of all men in prison and 36% of women in prison were abused as children, about twice the frequency seen among the general population.

The Department of Health & Human Services notes that child abuse reports in America involved 7.2 million children. More than one-half (54.1%) of perpetrators were women, 45% of perpetrators were men, and 0.9% were of unknown sex. The majority of victims consisted of three ethnicities—White (43.2%), Hispanic (23.6%), and African-American (21.4%).

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children born with fetal alcohol syndrome may develop learning and behavior problems including hyperactivity, poor concentration, and memory problems. The National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health conducted a study on neonatal abstinence syndrome and determined babies suffering from opiate withdrawal were more likely to have low birth-weight and respiratory complications. 11,000 babies are born to crack dependent mothers each year and cost the state $750mn p.a. to treat. Victims reported with the alcohol abuse child risk factor during their first year, 87.9% of the victims were reported during their first month of life.

These trends are worrying. As an increasing number of countries make it easier to divorce by offering extra support to single parents, responsibility and accountability are being cast aside. The government essentially endorses families to split and get the single parent to marry the state. 40% of White and 70% of black households in America are now single parent. In Japan one quarter of families are now single parent. As we wrote last week, children that grow up in single parent households are far more likely to suffer emotional problems and issues with self-esteem.

Since 2007, the rate of suicide deaths among children between the ages of 10 and 14 in the US has doubled according to the Center for Disease Control Prevention(CDC). Most children under 13 who kill themselves are boys: 76% of those who died in 1999-2015 were male. Since 2014, suicide has become one of the leading causes of death in children aged 10-19 in Japan. 60% of the children and 46% of the young adolescents in the US who died from suicide had problems with friends or family members. School problems and recent crises were noted as common triggers.

Per our previous post, the police department that encouraged school kids to walk up to and communicate with outcast kids as opposed to walking out on school would have far more positive long term impacts. Yet authorities seem more keen on policing political correctness. Running school programs that reinforce ideals of celebrating identity politics that openly discourage traditional families.  Reading through the many years of warnings both school authorities and law enforcement/intelligence authorities had prior to the Parkland, Florida shooter, Nikolas Cruz, committing his schoolyard rampage the egg-shell culture of not tackling his issues head on led to a potentially avoidable tragedy. Yet in today’s culture shaming innocents, scapegoating unrelated organisations, vilifying corporations and pushing expedience after the fact take priority to taking responsibility and looking at ways of preventing the root cause rather than the method.

After reading through these depressing statistics, it is not too hard to envisage things going from bad to worse from here. It isn’t just an American issue but a global trend that only gets harder to treat the longer it festers.

Crime in Japan – Breakdown of the Nuclear Family

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CM – Crime in Japan – Breakdown of the Nuclear Family

Following on from pensioner crime in Japan, this eye-opening report on the breakdown of traditional families points to a future unlike what many may not fathom. The link above contains the full report with a short summary can be found below.

Did you know that 25% of all marriages in Japan are couples that marry due to unplanned pregnancies? In Okinawa that rate is 42.4% Did you also know that 25% of all households with children in Japan are single-parent? The perception of the dutiful wife getting up at 4am to make breakfast for her samurai salaryman husband are virtually non-existent and half of divorces happen in age groups 55 years old and above. 25% of divorces occur in the 65yo+ cohort. The government changed the law in 2007 entitling wives to up to half of their ex-husband’s pension. Still the trend was rising sharply even before its introduction. Mrs Watanabe has had enough of her salaryman and wants out.

Domestic violence (DV) is seeing a very sharp upturn in Japan. Between 2010 and 2014, victims of DV have soared 60.6% against women and 650.1% against men. Most cases (over 60%) of DV were marital related. Recognizing the growing problem, The police have even developed a new category of DV which defines a divorced couple who are living under the same roof. Economic conditions for some families has become so tight that the stress of living with someone they do not want to be with now gets its own category, scoring over 6,000 cases alone in 2014.

Between 2010 and 2014, total reported stalking cases surged 36.6% to 24,837. 50% of stalking incidents recorded were related to partners (including former partners).

The Ministry for Health, Labor & Welfare (MHLW) has 208 child consultation centres which fielded over 88,000 cases in 2014, a 20.5%YoY increase or 22x the level of 20 years ago. Despite a 2.4x jump in social workers inside these child consultation centres over the last two decades they can’t keep up with the demand. The Japan National Police Agency (JNPA) statistics show a sharp jump in arrests for child abuse, 80% being due to physical violence causing injury. In 2013, 36 abused children died with 16 of them under 1 year old. Police note that child abuse is being driven by the breakdown in traditional family, unemployment and poverty, stats which we showed earlier to be rising steadily.

Crime in Japan is a problem that will not simply disappear with the evolving mix of aging demographics, poverty, unemployment, underemployment and economic stagnation. We note that the previous jump in Japanese crime started in 1997 and ran to a peak in 2003. Unemployment was a factor. In the crime boom of 2010-2016, we note that the unemployment rate has fallen but it masks disturbing trends in lower paid part-time work which is putting families under financial stress.

There is the smell of fear in the workplace. In the period 2002 to 2013, labour disputes almost trebled. Bullying and harassment (which are obviously less palatable for companies to have floating in the public domain) as a percent of total disputes has ballooned from 5.8% to almost 20% over the same period.

Another dilemma in the data is the employment referrals by government unemployment agencies for middle or advanced aged staff (45yo+) which shows that around 25% of them end up with work in a fixed term capacity of more than 4 months.

Ironically active retraining of inmates to help them find new careers after release occurs in prison. Why isn’t more being spent on finding ways to redeploy those out of prison? The idea that any job will do is a recipe for failure and cannot be relied upon as a sustainable program. Most vocational training by Hello Work, the government unemployment insurance agency, is broad and non-specific. Any specific job training will be ‘paid for’ which ultimately is limited to an unemployed person’s financial status and confidence a job will be attainable at the end of it.