#climateactionplan

Irish inhaling magic clovers

The Irish government is looking to ban new petrol and diesel car sales from 2030 in its ‘Climate Action Plan‘. One would imagine many car dealers will go out of business because the product offerings will be so slim and global supply won’t be there. Sadly the document contradicts itself too. Not to mention that Ireland’s contribution to global CO2 is only 0.000012%.

On page 33, the report drills holes in itself when it states,

Solar PV, some electrification of buses, and biofuel blending are identified in 2030 the NDP scenario but are not showing as cost- effective in MACC. Despite MACC analysis these technologies may remain in plan given other factors (e.g., exchequer cost, ease of implementation, need for public sector leadership)

So it is a poorly thought out plan to begin with such caveats.

For transport the manifesto denotes,

Accelerate the take up of EV cars and vans so that we reach 100% of all new cars and vans are EVs by 2030. This will enable achieving our target of 950,000 EVs on the road by 2030. This means approximately one third of all vehicles sold during the decade will be Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) or Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV)

Hang on a minute. In its own document on page 24 it hopes for at least 500,000 EVs on the road. Thats almost half what is mentioned in the exec summary! Which is it? Hoping no one reads this rubbish?

Make growth less transport intensive through better planning, remote and home-working and modal shift to public transport.

That will work. Just tell companies to keep people working from home. Why not get people to grow their own vegetables so they don’t need to drive to the supermarket?

Increase the renewable biofuel content of motor fuels

On page 33 under volumes, it mentions nothing. Just the E10 and B12 biofuel mix plans. Maybe Germany holds clues.

The German authorities went big for bio-fuels in 2008 forcing gas stands to install E-10 pumps to cut CO2. However as many as 3 million cars at the time weren’t equipped to run on it and as a result consumers abandoned it leaving many gas stands with shortages of the petrol and gluts of E-10 which left the petrol companies liable to huge fines (around $630mn) for not hitting government targets.

Claude Termes, a member of European Parliament from the Green Party in Luxembourg said in 2008 that “legally mandated biofuels were a dead end…the sooner It disappears, the better…my preference is zero…policymakers cannot close their eyes in front of the facts. The European Parliament is increasingly skeptical of biofuels.” Even ADAC told German drivers to avoid using E10 when traveling in other parts of continental Europe.

• Set targets for the conversion of public transport fleets to zero carbon alternatives

It is unlikely that Public transport is a swing factor. The hope is to have 1,250 electric buses by 2030. Even then it has concerns it may not hit the plan.

It is scary to think countries are willing to submit to the altar of this green madness. The word “public leadership” should cause people to run for the hills. For such a minuscule impact on the climate, Ireland is about to kill its competitiveness to protect against what? 55% renewable target with a huge uplift in EVs and an extra 600,000 households using electric heating, 400,000

The most interesting thing is that in the 2019 Irish budget, the spending ceiling for “Communication, Climate Action and Environment Group” is €391m out of total expenditures of €59.25bn or 0.6% of its budget. Note this ministry will max out at €391m for 2020 and 2021. How much will be achieved on the Climate Action Plan if resources aren’t going to plug the infrastructure gaps?

As much as the “woke” nature of the plan here is betting it misses by a country mile on dates and achievements. In the history of government led climate initiatives, failures far outweigh successes. Don’t forget Ireland gets 5% of tax revenues from fuel excise. So once consumers save the planet they can expect an EV tax to slug them instead.