#centralbanks

I’ll stick with my instincts rather than fall for a Harvard study because it is from Harvard

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Harvard University is without question one of the top schools globally. It has an enviable reputation and having that on one’s CV is hardly a hinderance. It is a status symbol.  In a discussion over global warming an individual was trying to legitimize climate alarmism by citing a Harvard University study. Harvard by the way is ranked top 5 worldwide in Environmental Science. The study as it turns out had been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), a US government agency responsible for allocating 24% of science funding that had been raked over the coals by the US Senate for gross mismanagement, fraud and waste. The National Science Foundation: Under the Microscope” paper from 2011 documented some of the misappropriation of funds as follows,

An $80,000 study on why the same teams always dominate March Madness”, a “$315,000 study suggesting playing FarmVille on Facebook helps adults develop and maintain relationships”, a study costing “$1 million for an analysis of how quickly parents respond to trendy baby names”, a study costing “$50,000 to produce and publicize amateur songs about science, including a rap called “Money 4 Drugz,” and a misleading song titled “Biogas is a Gas, Gas, Gas”;” a study costing”$2 million to figure out that people who often post pictures on the internet from the same location at the same time are usually friends”; and “$581,000 on whether online dating site users are racist”.Ineffective management examples, cited in the report, included “ineffective contracting”, “$1.7 billion in unspent funds sitting in expired, undisbursed grant accounts”, “at least $3 million in excessive travel funds”, “a lack of accountability or program metrics to evaluate expenditures” and “inappropriate staff behavior including porn surfing and Jello wrestling and skinny-dipping at NSF-operated facilities in Antarctica”.

It is often a tactic to cite supposedly credible bodies to legitimize and seek to win an argument. However at what point do we view Harvard’s stance on climate change as balanced? On Harvard’s own climate change page it is littered with a predetermined view. It is not to doubt the intelligence of the professors and scientists within the university but intelligence and ethics do not have to be mutually inclusive especially when it comes to procuring funds.

One has to wonder that the  NSF, which dispenses 24% of all university grants (some $7bn) is best positioned to fulfill this role given its past. As the Harvard climate page reveals there does not seem to be much attention paid to the alternate view. The offshoot of that is if the NSF wants to get ‘green policy’ outcomes, best pour funds into those schools that will help give the results they’re after.

In 2015 a claim was made against Harvard for not disclosing financial conflicts of interest. A press release entitled ‘Clean air and health benefits of clean power plan hinge on key policy decisions’ constituted a gushing praise of a commentary entitled ‘US power plant carbon standards and clean air and health co-benefits’ by Charles T. Driscoll, Jonathan J. Buonocore, Jonathan I. Levy, Kathleen F. Lambert, Dallas Burtraw, Stephen B. Reid, Habibollah Fakhraei & Joel Schwartz, published on May 4, 2015, in Nature Climate Change

The claim (a letter to the Dean) suggested that “two of the co-authors of the commentary, Buonocore and Schwartz, are researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Your press release quotes Buonocore thus: “If EPA sets strong carbon standards, we can expect large public health benefits from cleaner air almost immediately after the standards are implemented.” Indeed, the commentary and the press release constitute little more than thinly-disguised partisan political advocacy for costly proposed EPA regulations supported by the “Democrat” administration but opposed by the Republicans. Harvard has apparently elected to adopt a narrowly partisan, anti-scientific stance…The commentary concludes with the words “Competing financial interests: The authors declare no competing financial interests”. Yet its co-authors have received these grants from the EPA: Driscoll $3,654,609; Levy $9,514,391; Burtraw $1,991,346; and Schwartz (Harvard) $31,176,575. The total is not far shy of $50 million…Would the School please explain why its press release described the commentary in Nature Climate Change by co-authors including these lavishly-funded four as “the first independent, peer-reviewed paper of its kind”? Would the School please explain why Mr Schwartz, a participant in projects grant-funded by the EPA in excess of $31 million, failed to disclose this material financial conflict of interest in the commentary?Would the School please explain the double standard by which Harvard institutions have joined a chorus of public condemnation of Dr Soon, a climate skeptic, for having failed to disclose a conflict of interest that he did not in fact possess, while not only indulging Mr Schwartz, a climate-extremist, when he fails to declare a direct and substantial conflict of interest but also stating that the commentary he co-authored was “independent”?”

While I do not pretend to be a climate scientist by trade or study, fraud is fraud. The supposed beacons of virtue such as NOAA, IPCC, the CRU of the UEA have all been busted for manipulation of data to fit an end cause. The lack of ethics in certain cases has been so profound that had many of these scientists been in financial services they’d have lost licenses, paid multi billion in fines and served jail time. One person commented that too few in financial services have been locked up. I replied name me one scientist busted for fraud and misuse of public funds has seen the inside of a jail cell, much less fined or barred from teaching? The answer – NONE

I don’t need to possess a degree in astrophysics or science to determine poor ethics generally mean the science papers put forward should be viewed with deep skepticism. Yet we’re constantly told that the science is settled. How so? If one has to lie and deceive in order to scare us into action, how can one say that it is legitimate work? In fact I have been at pains to mention that the scrupulous acts of a few only ends up undermining potentially credible work conducted by others. Yet climate change has become a purely political issue and there is no question that sourcing funding dollars is easiest met when supporting alarmism. After all why would people want to throw dollars at skeptics who may come out with an alternative view? Don’t debate it. Some have suggested sceptics are like pedophiles and even more extreme views have suggested jail sentences. When people think that the only way to win the argument is to jail non believers you can be absolutely sure that the data is completely flawed in that it can’t stand on its own as an argument. Hence the manipulation to try to bully the movement onwards. Some Aussie universities (state funded mind you) are refusing a climate think tank being established on their campus for possessing an alternative view. You have to worry if universities, the bedrock of free thinking, are trying to ban it. Then again if kindergarten schools are being taught they are gender fluid and cross dressing is acceptable then you know there is a more sinister movement at work.

It was no surprise that Hurricane Irma has become Trump’s fault. Alarmists drew any data possible to connect Global Warming and hurricane activity despite the IPCC claiming several years back it  has little supportive data to prove it. So expediency is put before principle. Hopefully if no one has seen the IPCC climb down perhaps we can still convince them we can save the planet. All the meantime the IATA forecasts air travel will double in terms of passenger numbers between now and 2030 and SUVs top most vehicle sales in major markets.

To add to the farcical care factor for climate change by the masses The Australian noted, “On June 30 2017, after 12 years of “advancing climate change solutions”, the Climate Institute is closing its doors in Australia, a victim of the “I’ll ride with you but won’t pay” industry. You would think that Cate Blanchett, so happy to appear in the institute’s ads, could have taken the hat around her Hollywood A-list mates, such as Leonardo DiCaprio, Bono, Emma Watson and Brad Pitt, to tip in a few hundred thousand a year for the cause….But alas, the caravan has moved on and the greatest moral challenge of our time is now the Trump White House. For celebrities who fly eyebrow groomers to the Oscars, climate change is kinda yesterday. Still, to humour the faithful and to keep the dream alive, the 10th anniversary of Earth Hour was celebrated last Saturday night. You didn’t notice?”

When I was a staunch opponent of Greenspan’s reckless monetary policy in 2001 and said his actions would lead to a financial calamity in 6-7 years, many laughed at me. I bought gold at under $300. People thought I was mad as did the Bank of England. Barbs were frequent – “how could you possibly possess the intelligence of Greenspan? Back in your box!” I was told. Of course as a contrarian by nature, speaking out against pervading group think was met with a constant wave of ever increasing vitriolic criticism. Of course the simplest thing would have been to roll over and join the band wagon but I stuck to my guns. GFC was the result. In all that time, people used to shame my thinking by citing Harvard or other Ivy League studies on new paradigms. Indeed many of the brains behind the CDOs which eventually brought the financial sector to its knees were brainiacs from the Ivy League. In the end my instincts were bang on. Nothing to do with education levels.

The same arguments were hurled at me during Trump’s presidential campaign. Many people defriended me because my data kept showing to me he’d win. I am not American, I can’t vote but casting my own instincts ended up being a no brainer. Not once were credible arguments made to counter why Trump could win. People would post NY Times polls, CNN polls and so forth to legitimize the argument. Then say I was blind, stupid, bigoted, racist and the usual leftist identikit used to demonise a view. Group think is so dangerous. What it is doing is suppressing real views which show up in the polling booth.

Everywhere I read, the media wants to throw Trump to the wolves and run the lunatic, racist white nationalist card. For 9 months now. To be honest I think he will comfortably do two terms because the media has learned nothing and anything he does is vilified. Most Americans aren’t looking to him for spiritual guidance. He is vulgar and his manner is far from conventional and sometimes not very fitting of the office he serves. However he gets no credit for anything. The latest UN sanctions on North Korea are in large part because Trump has told China to get on with it. Trump said on national TV that he wants “China to sort it out and to stop delaying otherwise we’ll do it for you”. Yet the media is drumming WW3 rhetoric.

Same goes for the Paris Accord. What a stroke of genius. Let France, Germany and other nations pick up the tab for their ‘green policy’ madness and make up America’s renewable shortfall. It is kind of ironic that none of these nations ever pick on China, India or Russia which make up 50% of CO2 emissions for their lack of adherence to actually doing meaningful things to abate climate change albeit signatories to the UN accord. I argue it is like NATO in reverse. US pays a way bigger share into NATO, why not collect a refund via other nation’s virtue signalling which actually helps America First by making other nations less competitive. Brilliant.

DACA – many Americans, including 41mn on food stamps, will welcome the removal of illegal immigrants from their country who in their view are siphoning their ability to get out of poverty. DACA to them isn’t about not being compassionate but realizing that a $20 trillion deficit and loading more onto an overcrowded system isn’t helping. Once again regardless of what people think of Trump he had the fewest white voters and largest share of black and Hispanic voters than Romney or McCain. Hardly the result for a white nationalist, racist bigot. At the current rate if the Democrats run Michelle Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Hilary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren or any other identity politician against him in 2020 they’ll lose. The mid terms won’t be as bad as many calling. The one midterm already returned a Republican despite massive Hollywood support even ferrying voters to booths.

Transgender in the military. I spoke to two dozen US military personnel last month to ask their opinions. The 100% response was, “we think it is inappropriate for the taxpayer to fund sexual reassignment surgery while serving including several years of rehab and ongoing drug therapy…it is taking the p*ss…we serve our country because we love it and we don’t have room to support social experiments to protect freedom!” There was no real issue of transgender per se rather a problem of providing funds in n already tightly allocated budget for such medical expenditure. Several even spoke of the stupidity of LGBT pride day in the armed forces. What has the ability to fight got to do with what goes on in the bedroom? One said “if we had a heterosexual pride day” we’d never hear the end of it.

So when you communicate with the real people you find the truth if you are prepared to listen. The beauty of social media and indeed Google (which happily acts as a Big Brother on what it considers acceptable) is that many people reach for articles they probably haven’t read properly and use them as ways to ram home an argument because they carry a brand name. Harvard is a wonderful institution but as we’ve seen it has run into questions of conflicts of interest.

I happen to think that social media is having the opposite effect on brainwashing to tell the truth. 99.9% of what I see posted has little thought to it. The more people I speak to the more they are ignoring noise. Many people share articles without putting some basis of why they post it. In many cases people are too afraid to face a doxxing or backlash. Bring it on. To me if you post things in the public domain then be prepared to invite criticism. On my site I do not censor, cut off or delete readers. They are free to come and go as they please. I only request they keep profanity to a minimum.

So in summary, the idea that we bow down to venerable institutions to seek guidance is as flawed today as it ever was. I’ll gladly stick to gut instincts because to date they have worked so far. Having said that I should put a disclaimer that was always plastered on financial services product, “Past results are no guarantee of future performance”

From Sesame to Elm Street

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ETF markets continue to surge in popularity. With low fees and basic packaging of the ETF product even Big Bird can understand what The Count is going on about. No wonder investors are snapping up these products faster than the Cookie Monster. However there is something chilling about the ETF market. In the lead up to and eventual crash of Lehmans et al CDOs, CDSs and other synthetic products were seen as the root of all evil. They were so complex that even Fields Medal winners in mathematics couldn’t make head nor tail of them. The ETF became the opposite – being too simplistic – and with that the product has brought huge complacency. To that end Sesame Street could well switch to Elm Street.

Today assets invested in ETF/Ps comprise over $3 trillion globally. Put simply the new funds flowing into ETFs vs. traditional mutual funds is at a 100:1 ratio and in terms of AUM is on par with total hedge fund assets which have been in existence for 3 times as long.

However ETFs, despite increasing levels of sophistication, have brought about higher levels of market volatility. Studies have shown that a one standard deviation move of S&P500 ETF ownership carries 21% excess intraday volatility. Regulators are also realising that limit up/down rules are exacerbating risk pricing and are seeking to revise as early as October 2015. In less liquid markets excess volatility has proved to be 54% higher with ETFs than the actual underlying indices. A full report can be seen here.

With the continuation of asset bubbles in a TINA (there is no alternative) world, ETFs in my view will lead to massive disappointments down the line. Their downfall could well invite the revival of the research driven fund manager model again as robots show they’re not as infallible as first thought in managing the volatility. Don’t forget humans designed the algorithms.

There is also the added risk of whether some ETFs actually hold the physical of the indices or commodities they mimic. A gold ETF is a wonderfully good way to store wealth without resorting to one’s own bank vault but how many ETF owners have inspected the subterranean cage that supposedly holds the physical the ETF is backed by? Has it been lent out? Does it own a fraction of stated holdings? It could be any other commodity too. Of course the ETF providers bang on about the safety of the products but how many times have we gasped when fraud reared it’s ugly head right in front of us. Bernie Maddoff ring any bells?

Given the implied volatility on the downside we need to bear in mind the actions of central banks. The Bank of Japan (BoJ) is the proud owner of 60% of the ¥20 trillion+ domestic ETF market. While the BoJ says it isn’t finished expanding its world’s largest central bank balance sheet (now 100% of GDP), the US Fed is looking to reduce its balance sheet by over 40% in order to normalize. While one can applaud some level of common sense pervading sadly the consequences of defusing the timer on the bomb they created at a period when the US economy is showing signs of recession will only be an overhang on asset markets. Should the US market be put through the grinder, global markets will follow.

It is one thing for the Fed to be prudent. It is another for it to be trying to cover its tracks through higher interest rates in a market that looks optically pretty but hides serious life threatening illnesses. The Fed isn’t ahead of the curve at all. It is so far behind the 8-ball that its actions are more likely to accelerate rather than alleviate a crisis. Point to low unemployment or household asset appreciation as reasons to talk of a robust economy but things couldn’t be further from the truth. Wage growth is not the stuff of dreams and the faltering signs in auto, consumer and residential markets should give reason for concern.

Since GFC we have witnessed the worst global economic revival in history. The weakest growth despite record pump priming and balance sheet expansion. Money velocity is continually falling and the day Greenspan dispensed with M3 reporting one knew that things were bad and “nothing to see here” was the order of the day.

Record levels of debt (just shy of $220 trillion or 300% of GDP when adding private, corporate and government), slow growth, paltry interest rates and coordinated asset buying have not done anything other than blown more air into a bubble that should have been burst. GFC didn’t hit the reset button. Central banks just hit print to avoid the pain. We’ve doubled up on stupidity, forgot the idea of prudent and sensible growth through savings and just partied on. Ask any of your friends in finance what they “really” think and I can assure you that after a few drinks they’ll tell you they’re waiting for the exit trade. They know Armageddon is coming but just don’t know when

Whether we like it or not, the reset button will be hit. I often argue people should not worry about the return ON their money but the return OF it. Global markets can’t be bailed out again with massive cash infusion. That has been a recipe for disaster, only widening the gap between haves and have nots. Debt must be allowed to go bad, banks must be allowed to go bust and free markets must be freed from the shackles of state sponsored manipulation to set prices. It will be ugly but more of the same can kicking won’t work.

ETFs are a sign of the times. They represent the slapdash approach to life these days. Time saving apps if you will. However nothing beats hard nosed analysis to understand what awaits us. Poor old Big Bird will be the canary in the coal mine and Sesame Street will be renamed Elm Street as the Kruger’s move in to give us nightmares Janet Yellen assures us aren’t possible.

Perhaps that is the ultimate question. As you go to work each day do you honestly feel that things are peachy as the management town hall meetings would have you believe? Are your friends or colleagues all bulled up about the future? Perhaps that is easier to answer than an ETF.

Yellen’s Fedtime stories

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US Fed Chair Janet Yellen uttered perhaps some of the most bizarre words to come out of a central banker. So much so that Alan Greenspan’s “I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.” seems almost comprehensible by comparison. Yellen told an audience that she believes we won’t see another severe financial crisis in our lifetimes. Either Ms Yellen is not long for the world or denial is running deep within her veins. One of her own FOMC board members (James Bullard) wrote a piece on why the Fed needs to trim its balance sheet from $4.47tn to around $2.5 trillion) so they can prepare for the next horror that awaits.  Even Minnesota Fed Reserve Bank President Neel Kashkari said the likelihood of another financial crisis is 2/3rds. We have a world with debt up to its eyeballs and global interest rate policies that have only led to the slowest post slowdown growth in history. The signs of a global slowdown are becoming ever more obvious even in the US. Slowing auto sales and rising delinquencies are but one signal. The imminent collapse of so many public pension funds another.

Had she not seen the European Commission’s decision to let Italy spend up to 17 billion euros to clean up the mess left by two failed banks? The news is not only another whack for Italian taxpayers but a setback for the euro zone’s banking union, and a backflip for the EU’s stance on non-standard bailouts. The Italian government wound down Banca Popolare di Vicenza and Veneto Banca, two regional lenders struggling under the weight of non-performing loans which averages 20% across the nation and up to 50% in the south. Intesa Sanpaolo bought the banks’ good assets for one euro, and was promised another 4.8 billion euros in state aid to deal with restructuring costs and bolster its capital ratio. Italy’s taxpayers get to keep the bad loans, which could end up costing them another 12 billion euros. Even the Single Resolution Board — whose purpose is to take the politically difficult decision of whether to close a bank out of the hands of governments — chose not to intervene.

Last year four Italian banks were rescued and it seems that since Lehman collapsed in 2008 non performing loans (NPLs) have soared from 6% to almost 20%. Monte Dei Paschi De Siena, a bank steeped in 540 years of history has 31% NPLs and its shares are 99.9% below the peak in 2007. Even Portugal and Spain have lower levels of NPLs. The IMF suggested that in southern parts of Italy NPLs for corporates is closer to 50%!

Italy is the 3rd largest economy in Europe and 30% of corporate debt is held by SMEs who can’t even make enough money to repay the interest. The banks have been slow to write off loans on the basis it will eat up the banks’ dwindling capital. It feels so zombie lending a la Japan in the early 1990s but on an even worse scale.

Not to worry, the Italian Treasury tells us the ECB will buy this toxic stuff! But wait, the ECB is not allowed to buy ‘at risk’ stuff. So it will bundle all this near as makes no difference defaulted garbage (think CDO) in a bag and stamp it with a bogus credit rating such that the ECB can buy it. In full knowledge that most of the debt will never be repaid, the ECB still violates its own rules which state clearly that any debt they buy ‘cannot be in dispute’.

The Bank of Japan has no plans to cut back on the world’s largest central bank balance sheet. It continues to Hoover up 60% of new ETF issues at such an alarming pace it is the largest shareholder of over 100 corporates. Then there is the suggestion of buying all $10 trillion of outstanding JGBs and convert them into zero-rate (+miniscule annual service fee) perpetuals.

Australia’s banks are now the most loaded with mortgage debt globally at 60% of the total loan book.  Second is daylight and third Norway at 40%. Private sector debt to GDP is 185%. We have a government who can’t tighten its belt basing its budget on rosy scenarios that will be improbable. Aussie banks have been slapped with a new tax and with the backdrop of a rising US rate environment, the 40% wholesale funded Aussie banks will be forced to accept higher cost of funds. That will be passed straight onto consumers that are already being crushed under the weight of mortgages. One bank survey by ME Bank in Australia said that 1/3rd would struggle to pay a month’s mortgage if they lost their jobs.

Had Ms Yellen forgot to read the St Louis Fed’s survey which revealed that 45% of Americans can’t raise $400 in an emergency without selling something? USA Today reported that 7 out of 10 Americans have less than $1,000 in savings to their name.

“Last year, GoBankingRates surveyed more than 5,000 Americans only to uncover that 62% of them had less than $1,000 in savings. Last month GoBankingRates again posed the question to Americans of how much they had in their savings account, only this time it asked 7,052 people. The result? Nearly seven in 10 Americans (69%) had less than $1,000 in their savings account…Breaking the survey data down a bit further, we find that 34% of Americans don’t have a dime in their savings account, while another 35% have less than $1,000. Of the remaining survey-takers, 11% have between $1,000 and $4,999, 4% have between $5,000 and $9,999, and 15% have more than $10,000.”

So Chair Yellen, we are not sure what dreamland you are living but to suggest that we won’t see another financial crisis in our lifetime almost guarantees it will happen. The Titanic was thought unsinkable until history proved otherwise. Money velocity is not rising and every dollar printed is having less and less impact. I thought it nigh on impossible to surpass the stupidity of Greenspan but alas you have managed it.

Reminding ourselves of corporate credit quality (or the lack thereof)

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While we bathe in the Trump bull market it is best not to forget the deterioration in credit quality. This chart shows the trend of credit ratings for ‘investment grade’ equities in the US by decile. Note the alarming trend of the highest rated companies declining as a percentage of total and the sharp uptick in deteriorating low ‘investment’ grade credit ratings. Yes, credit quality seems to be getting much worse.

For all of the turbo charged low interest rate environment set by central banks, the ‘real’ state of corporate financial health on aggregate continues to worsen despite near full employment, record level equity markets and every other word of encouragement from our politicians.

TINA (there is no alternative) certainly would back the theory that money is looking for a place to go. However if this is the state of the corporate sector at arguably the sweet spot of the economic cycle I shudder to think the state of potential bankruptcies that will come when the cycle takes a turn for the worse. This is a very bad sign.

Rick Santelli rants at central banks and yells “don’t help anymore”

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I don’t often watch CNBC but Rick Santelli made absolute sense when he tore into US Fed Chairman Janet Yellen over her plan to potentially buy equities to support the market like the Bank of Japan does now. Yellen still will have to get approval from Congress to embark on such a journey but it goes against her statement during the FOMC press conference where she boldly claimed “we’re not a body subject to group think”. Santelli correctly pointed out that price discovery would be ruined by such action.

As we know from Japan’s experience, the BoJ has had zero impact on consumer behaviour by buying equities and ruined market dynamics by becoming the largest shareholder in a growing number of companies. If they keep up the good work Japanese corporate’s will become state owned enterprises.

Going back to the Fed. Last week I wrote that Yellen’s language beggars belief. On the one hand she talks about the faster pace of economic growth all the while the Fed cuts long term and 2016 growth to 1.8%. Not one week later the NY Fed has cut 2016 growth to 1.4%.

Im amazed at how blind markets can be. Equitie markets continue to sustain lofty heights based on slowing aggregate earnings, worsening credit ratings and a complete failure by central banks to restore confidence.

Last report from the ECB showed it took €18 to create €1 of GDP given all their asset purchases. This is the problem. Without money velocity the  central banks only highlight to themselves it is the wrong path yet they still watering the lawns with gasoline while smoking. 

Gov Kuroda how do you intend to control the yield curve?

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The BoJ intends to keep much of the same game in play with the addition of ‘yield curve control’ QE measures which almost sounds like an automotive active safety system. One of my astute former colleagues correctly pointed out that “if we have surrendered the yield curve to the complete control of the BoJ and the BoJ wants to steepen the curve, how can they do this without tightening money supply, given liquidity at the short end of the curve? How is this good for a weak yen? Who is the willing counter party to a manipulator now looking top SELL not BUY to manipulate prices downward? Does this mean the end of fixed income departments?

Once again, market manipulation as being conducted on the scale done by the BoJ would result in the multi-decade sentencing of anyone in the private sector. Although perhaps given Japan’s woeful prosecution of market manipulators (i.e. fines of $500 (yes five hundred dollars only) for insider trading) then perhaps the BoJ does not see its actions as anti-capitalist. My bigger concern remains yet again the refusal to allow the market to function properly. Ploughing more into equity ETFs might seem a helping hand to Mrs Watanabe but she is not out there spending any gains she might get. At the rates the BoJ is buying if this strategy doesn’t work the BoJ will end up part-nationalising listed companies which in turn will fly in the face of PM Abe trying to attract foreign capital to invest in Japan when liquidity is being sucked out of the market.

I did find the comment in the opening remarks of Kuroda’s assessment somewhat overly optimistic for the real economic impacts to reflect it – “More than three years have passed since the Bank introduced QQE in April 2013. In this period, Japan’s economic activity and prices have improved significantly, and Japan’s economy is no longer in deflation.

He goes further to highlight the ‘vision’ which for the most part is theoretical gibber.

“The main transmission channel of QQE would be the reduction in real interest rates. Namely, (1) people’s deflationary mindset would be dispelled and inflation expectations would be raised [this is not happening!] through the Bank’s large-scale monetary easing under its strong and clear commitment to achieving the price stability target of 2 percent. At the same time, (2)downward pressure would be put on nominal interest rates across the entire yield curve through the Bank’s purchases of JGBs. (3) Together, these developments would reduce real interest rates. (4) The decline in real interest rates would lead to an improvement in the output gap. (5) The improvement in the output gap, together with rising inflation expectations, would push up the observed inflation rate. (6) Once people experienced an actual rise in the inflation rate [Japan has coped with near as makes no difference zero inflation for 20 years], they would adapt their inflation expectations, resulting in higher inflation expectations and further reinforcing this process…In addition, it was envisaged that as a result of the Bank’s monetary easing, (7) asset prices such as stock prices [fuelled by artificial ETF buying] as well as the foreign exchange rate [FX is back to the same levels of April 2013 and since NIRP has strengthened 10%] would reflect actual or anticipated improvements in economic activity and prices, thereby improving financial conditions and having a positive impact on economic activity and prices. Finally, it was envisaged that (8) it would work through the portfolio re-balancing effect by increasing investors’ appetite for risky assets [Japanese are traditionally very conservative investors and this is pushing them out of their comfort zone, so much so they’re buying home safes], thereby exerting a positive effect on prices of risky assets and leading to an increase in lending [Japanese banks are hesitant to lend – lending sideways since April 2013].

Toward the end the BoJ acknowledges:

“Given that the decline in deposit rates has been smaller than the decline in lending rates, the decline in lending rates, however, has come at the expense of financial institutions’ lending margins. Therefore, the extent to which a further decline in interest rates translates into a reduction in lending rates will also depend on financial institutions’ lending stance going forward.”

Although I interpret the “Moreover, reflecting financial institutions’ search for positive yield, new developments have been observed in the field of corporate finance such as an increase in the issuance of super-long-term corporate bonds and in funding through long-term subordinated loans” comment to suggest that gullible investors that get sucked into buying super LT corp bonds to get a morsel of yield may get completely thumped if weakening credit conditions for such enterprises (e.g. a Sharp or Toshiba) down the line crater their asset worth given the extended duration.

“In addition, it should be noted that financial institutions can boost their profits by selling assets they hold to realize valuation gains, which tend to increase when interest rates fall and the yield curve flattens.”  I’m sorry but the BoJ promoting this activity as a virtuous circle just shows how Mickey Mouse the amateur levels of desperation at the BoJ are. This is kindergarten level commentary although at least their translators haven’t mastered the Fed’s use of comical language.

Finally

“Another issue is that an excessive decline in interest rates — especially at the long and super-long end — lowers the rates of return on insurance and pension products, and increases firms’ pension benefit obligations. The direct impact of this on economic activity as a whole is unlikely to be substantial. However, attention needs to be paid to the possibility that it can cause uncertainty regarding the sustainability of financial functioning in a broader sense, with a negative impact on economic activity through a deterioration in people’s sentiment.”

Perhaps I should ask why the Japanese government will explicitly withdraw ‘public pension’ money from individual bank accounts of those who earn Y3mn from Y3.5mn but are not contributing, largely because they have no faith in the pension system. Some 270,000 people are supposedly guilty of this crime but Although the return profile of Japanese pensions is far more realistic than US public pension funds, the unfunded risks going forward remain.

So what looked promising on the announcement is now being seen for what it is. Poorly thought out strategy. Trying to manipulate a curve where the BoJ might be both seller and buyer…hmmmm

Playing with Financial Plutonium

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I am still dumbfounded by the level of complacency in financial markets. How  can there be any confidence in our financial system?  Reality is that confidence continues to wane. I mentioned a while back that the headline stock index in Europe has no financial stocks in it. Never in my history in financial markets have I witnessed this. It isn’t because other stocks have got bigger. Financials in Europe have shrunk to such irrelevant levels that they don’t make the cut. Argue all you want about FinTech revolutionizing banking as we know it however don’t dismiss that the core of financial markets resembles a rotting carcass with so little meat that even vultures are considering vegetarianism so slim are the pickings. If the financial sector is sick and it is what greases the economy beware this signal.

One thing that hasn’t changed is the arrogance of the banks. Deutsche proudly protesting that the DoJ’s $14bn fine is just a “starting point” all the while its shares dwindle at all time lows.  Europe’s most powerful bank 1/3rd the size of Australia’s NAB. I’m working on a report looking at the deterioration of financial profitability and market relevance.

All the while though I keep shouting from the rooftops like the tramp from Blazing Saddles and the bell chimes right as I try to warn of impending  global economic disaster.

“The world economy is dying (clang!)”

“what did he say?”

“I think he said the world economy is flying!”

“No, goddamnit!, I said the world economy is dying (clang!)”

You get the picture. What people still haven’t grasped is the velocity of money continues to slow rapidly. For every dollar pumped into the economy, smaller fractions of GDP are created. In Europe it takes €7 to create €1. In China it takes RMB8 to create RMB1. In the US it takes around $4.5. The more morphine that is pumped into the patient the less efficacy. The debt burden mounts to unsustainable levels. Asset bubbles abound. Central banks keep pushing on sweeping the damage under the carpet. Europe is at stall speed. France and Italy didn’t grow last quarter. The US stumbled into 1% territory while the previous quarter was revised to 0.8% – hardly cracking growth.

The most recent worrying red flag is Greenspan weighing into the central bank policy debate. If there was ever a tail-end Charlie behind the curve he is it. I look at the propaganda pushed by the White House in a self congratulatory tone. This idea that everything is fine. American wealth at all time highs and poverty at 50 year lows. The problem with such fiction is that Main Street is actually living the struggle. They are not theory. They are reality. Whether crushing pensioners with a lack of sensible low risk income products, or celebrating recent inflation through rent rises and healthcare costs is not to pat one’s back over. Real wages are falling, consumption is waning and life is getting tougher. Steeper Obamacare prices and higher rents don’t boost economic growth. This is bad inflation and most other items continue to struggle under the weight of chronic overcapacity. Hanjin Shipping woke us up to that sad fact.

It’s brutal out there but the Democrats talk of prosperity at the same time complaining at the lack of progress on welfare despite having their wise sage Obama at the helm for the past 8 years.

More misguided central bank policy continues in group think like fashion.  It is as if they are enriching financial plutonium to such dangerous levels that imminent detonation could occur. The experiment keeps going but the scale of the collateral damage is growing exponentially. Many central bankers know how bad things have got but pray they can leave their ivory towers and seek shelter before it blows up on their watch so they can evade direct responsibility.

For all of the pump priming, toxic asset buying and NIRP strategies of central bankers, there is one constant in all of this. Pain must eventually be taken to restore equilibrium. The longer we store up the gangrenous irradiated mess that has and is being created for almost two decades the bigger the scale of fall out.

So many are totally unprepared for the coming event. People will still argue that the most experienced and brightest minds work within these banks so we should back their collective wisdom but I’d bet money that most if not all have no idea about how the average Joe and Joanne works. Funny thing is the average Joe and Joanne are feeling the pain everyday as they struggle to get by. They’ve had enough.

I’m surprised the Democrats, the party that is supposed to favour the afflicted, continue to miss the obvious. Trump would never have seen the light of day had the establishment listened to their cries for help.

In closing, I feel the same vibes I did when I called the impending crisis that was GFC1. This time will be much worse.  Financial plutonium is too rich and reaching fissile levels. Discount everything coming from the authorities. Pure common sense tells us the numbers don’t match reality.

There will be no “I told you so!” moment for me. Who would want to bask in misery?