Aerospace

Aussie company has only approved technology for Qantas Boeing 737NG wing crack detection

Very simple story. Aussie based company Structural Monitoring Systems (SMN AX) has the only approved crack detection product in the market.

The 5 Qantas Boeing 737 NG planes (and dozens like it around the world) could have had far earlier detection with SMN’s CVM technology. To cut a long story short, CVM technology has vacuum channels, which if broken (via cracks emerging) notifies the ground crew of the structural issue.

The company already has a contract with Delta Airlines for its aircraft. This type of technology not only has the potential to ward off catastrophic failures but reduce the cost of inspections for airlines.

CM has owned SMN for over a decade. This trend was always coming.

Boeing raises 20yr forecast

Boeing reports airlines will need around 44,000 new commercial aircraft worth $6.8 trillion by 2038, vs. 43,000 planes worth $6.49 trillion estimated in 2018. The biggest demand will remain for single-aisle jets. 32,420 narrow-body planes are likely to be built.

So much for the fear of global warming induced by air travel. In total, planes are 2% of human induced CO2. Or 0.00024% of the CO2 in the atmosphere.

Although the International Air Transport Association (IATA) wilted to the gun held to its head by the UN. The IATA has got behind the movement to do its bit for climate change. In a two page flyer, it covered the idea that we reckless passengers must consider our carbon footprint but at the same time help the U.N. raise $40bn in taxes, sorry ‘climate finance,’ between 2021 and 2035.

The reality is if Greta Thunberg receives an invite by the Queensland government to lecture on climate change she can rest easy that the footprint in the air will be so tiny because there isn’t a diesel electric train to get here.