Prison

If you do it for churches make sure you enforce it for every other faith too – no exceptions!

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In 2012 Denmark ruled that churches would be legally forced to marry gay couples regardless of the beliefs of many of the clergy. With Australia’s same sex marriage (SSM) debate on the table will parliament protect the rights of the church to decide on the way it chooses to conduct its affairs? If Australia votes in favour of SSM then we should accept society’s decision on the matter. Period. However, will churches be forced to do things against their will like Denmark? Why only churches? Shouldn’t gay people of the Buddhist, Shinto, Hindu, Muslim, Jewish and any other faith be equally able to force their relevant house of prayer to conduct a gay wedding ceremony? It must be one rule for all, not just the soft target. Where are the activists demanding this? Exactly, nowhere to be seen. Given we live in a world where certain sandwich chains refuse to sell pork products to avoid offending certain customer groups perhaps we should insist that hardware stores refrain from selling timber and nails because it might offend Christians.

The question is not about whether gay couples have the right to marry. If they are allowed to do so is it fair that people who hold different beliefs to them (which does not equate to homophobia) be forced to do things against them? Surely the whole purpose of marriage is to celebrate love, togetherness and commitment. Will that day feel more special when you know the priest has a gun to his head? To reiterate – if we are to force one religion to tow the line, we must prepared to accept without question all other faiths to obey the law. No exceptions.

Forcing voters to become eunuchs by slicing off their free speech

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Kiss your free speech good-bye. Australia is going straight down the slippery slope of Canada in seeking to shut down the expression of open legitimate debate. Labor Senator Louise Pratt broke down today after explaining the horrid episode of receiving an anti-same sex marriage (SSM) pamphlet when going to the shops with her 3yr-old son and his three fathers. Instead of refuting the content of the anti-SSM pamphlet with facts (and her own experience) she chose to break down and claim how she could not bear reliving the content. Yes, she played a victim. She got a consoling hug from a Greens senator. By her own admission she said that the “no” campaigners have already lost the argument and will lose the vote. If that is the case then why the tears? Get on the front foot and defend your beliefs Senator Pratt rather than run to the bosom of totalitarian protections. If the plebiscite is carried the “No” campaigners will accept democracy.

Now we will have emergency laws that will prosecute someone who expresses a legitimate opinion with fines of up to $12,600. Who decides what constitutes hurting someone’s feelings? The PM only last week said that “we can rely on the wisdom and decency of the Australian people to decide on same sex marriage.” Three days later these same people will be muzzled. Why do we need people policing citizens for holding legitimate beliefs? We can be sure that if pro-SSM people abuse Anti-SSM then nothing will happen. We already have a gay Fairfax journalist who spoke of hate-f*cking politicians who didn’t support SSM to drive out their homophobia. I would bet that he wouldn’t get charged under this new law. It only applies to the dinosaurs and their antiquated backward thinking. Activists tried to get a doctor struck off the register for holding a belief in traditional marriage. Archbishops have been dragged before courts and hotels threatened if they allow anti-SSM meetings to take place.

Shame on the Conservatives to roll over so easily on this subject. The sad reality is that most people made up their minds way before the vote has even taken place. I don’t need WordPress to adorn my blog page with rainbow flag backed buttons and I do not need Subway to tell me to vote SSM when I buy a sandwich. I don’t need Qantas to give me an acceptance ring and I certainly don’t need tax dollars squandered on one side of the debate only. I couldn’t care less with those who want to virtue signal with their Facebook avatars with “I’m voting yes”. Good for you. None of that peer pressure would convince me in anyway on which way I would vote. The beauty of a polling booth is that you can vote how you like. Yet this day and age is all about vilifying non compliance to activism

Yet our government shows its cowardice and even worse, contempt for the public. In an attempt to gag free speech people will be told what they can and can’t say. Holding beliefs which are perfectly acceptable on rational grounds will be policed and removed from the Newspeak dictionary. I am sure the Australian Human Rights Commission is rubbing its hands with glee to take more control of the nanny state.

Not supporting SSM doesn’t make one a homophobe but that is how the activists seek to mock and ridicule non-conformity. Ramrodding gender fluidity and cross dressing in kindergarten and primary schools is just another shift in removing the ability to protect traditional values. In the majority of cases, the best outcome for children is to have their biological mother and father as parents. It shouldn’t be seen as hateful to think like that.

Once again, bit by bit freedoms are being removed. California is looking to introduce laws to prosecute people for using the wrong pronoun. Do we seriously need the judicial system to be clogging up the courts with such petty matters? Canada’s M-103 and Ontario’s M-89. More laws to shut people up. It is appalling. Free speech is an absolute unalienable right. Just because one might not agree with another doesn’t make it hate speech. Yet our laws will ensure that anything outside of the newspeak dictionary will get people prosecuted.

People ask me why I left the Liberal Party of Australia. I say, “I didn’t leave them, they left me!”

Crime in Japan – BBC interview 7 July

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Tomorrow, BBC World Service’s Edwin Lane will release the pre-recorded interview he conducted with me several months ago on the back of a series I wrote on Crime in Japan – Part 1 – Geriatric Jailbirds, Part 2 – Breakdown of the nuclear family and Part 3 – Fraud, Drugs, Murder, Yakuza and the Police some 15 months ago. Since then the reports have been reported in 14 different languages and reached c.5 million page/podcast impressions as the BBC also conducted an interview on BBC Radio 5 “Up all night”

The reason I ended up writing the research paper came by chance. While trawling through the Japanese National Police Agency statistics looking for data to help a client on motorcycle license trends, I stumbled over the crime stats and couldn’t believe the wealth of information that showed the sharp jumps in crime levels. There is some suggestion that much under-reporting went on several decades ago but as you can see in the reports the charts speak for themselves.

On a global basis, Japanese crime is low on almost any measure but the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has had to expand prison capacity 50% in the last decade, facilitated early release to prepare for a sharp rise in elderly inmates. The pension-age cohort in prison now represents the highest percentage of total inmates. With that the MoJ has had to apply for a supplemental budget to cover the extra cost of healthcare in prison as the average age rises.

 

Melbourne Antifa claims they are victims of Andrew Bolt’s thuggery

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How deranged does Melbourne Antifa have to be to use the failed attack on Andrew Bolt as an excuse to launch a victimhood claim against him? To be honest their predictability was never in doubt. Apart from the woeful following of Melbourne Antifa’s Facebook page (97)…

IMG_0169.PNG…the comments section of their post revealed their own kind refrained from the comments section after others decided to tell them how Bolt rightly acted in self defense.

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To even entertain a claim of violence when indeed it was your ‘family’ that started the whole thing makes me think that with such intelligence the three perpetrators should lodge the claim at North Melbourne Police station and see how far they get.

Get out of jail free in Victoria

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You have to wonder whether the Victorian judicial system has been channeling Oscar Wilde’s “every saint has a past. Every sinner has a future”? How they can give Akon Mawien, an 18-yo with supposed links to the Apex Gang and one who pleaded guilty to armed robbery, aggravated burglary and theft to the value of $200,000 a 12-month suspended sentence is beyond me? Judge Liz Gaynor agreed his crimes were appalling but believed Mawien showed good prospects of rehabilitation but thought putting him in an adult prison might lead him to be broken. Judge Gaynor even added “This is a young man of exemplary background (given his mentoring role as a language assistant in the Mother of God school and activity with a local cricket club).”

So provided he is a good boy for 12 months, our court system is happy for such an individual to remain a ‘role model.’ Does Her Honour believe that somehow giving a confessed criminal a suspended sentence somehow sends a message to gang members to see sense and give up their felenous ways? If anything what a wonderful way to show that crime does indeed pay by way of leniency. Do parents at the Mother of God school want their children mixing with someone like this?

Will he serve 100s of hours of menial community service? Will he be required to wear a tag? Will he required to or assist in the return of the $200,000 he helped steal? It would appear that the court may well turn a blind eye.

This smacks of an apologist judicial system. I am sure some others would have had the book thrown at them. Then again when a migrant tried unsuccessfully to set fire to a petrol station the Victorian Police chose to do nothing because he failed, no one was hurt and they couldn’t spare the time.

What world do we live in where the perpetrators are turned into the victims and we end up blaming our shortcomings in society for their failure to assimilate? That is right we punish ourselves and muzzle common sense figuring its easier to jail good citizens for speaking the truth than make examples of people who knowingly break the very laws set to protect society. Madness. If Mawien stole a candy bar I could understand but this is the sentence for armed robbery, aggravated burglary and theft? If he reforms perhaps we should award him an Order of Australia. 2018 Australian of the Year?

A happy tale(nt) among all the gloomy headlines

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Amid all the gloom and doom in today’s headlines, it is sometimes nice to reflect on what goodness there is in the world especially those who are given an opportunity to shine against all of the self-entitled people that live among us. Gustavo Dudamel is a Venezuelan composer who brought together the undiscovered talents of kids from Venezuela’s least fortunate areas and through the Orquesta Sinfónica Simón Bolívar made magic. What these kids, who in many cases hadn’t a lick of musical training, transformed into well – judge for yourselves. It is astonishing that in a world of virtue signaling, these kids took an opportunity through benevolent philanthropists and knocked it out of the park because they saw that persistence, hard work and fun can be turned into a talent rather than moaning for someone to feel sorry for them. Bravo. How could you not feel pride? Even if you aren’t a fan of classical music I won’t be the least bit surprised if you end up buying an album.

Australia – the penal colony as of 2016

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The Australian Bureau of Statistics notes the number of prisoners in adult corrective services custody increased by 8% from 36,134 prisoners at 30 June, 2015 to 38,845 at 30 June, 2016. The national imprisonment rate was 208 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase of 6% from 196 prisoners per 100,000 adult population in 2015.

The number of unsentenced prisoners in adult corrective services custody increased by 22%, from 9,898 at 30 June, 2015 to 12,111 at 30 June, 2016. This follows a 21% increase from 2014 to 2015. Sentenced prisoners increased by 2% from 26,163 to 26,649 prisoners.

By State as at June 30, 2016

New South Wales

  • The number of adult prisoners in New South Wales prisons was 12,629, an increase of 7% (832 prisoners) from 2015.
  • New South Wales had the largest adult prisoner population nationally, accounting for 33% of the total Australian adult population.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 211 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 200 prisoners per 100,000 adult population in 2015.
  • Just over half (52% or 6,517 prisoners) of prisoners had previously been imprisoned under sentence.
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (21% or 2,653 prisoners), followed by illicit drug offences (17% or 2,140 prisoners) and sexual assault (12% or 1,476 prisoners).

Victoria

  • The number of adult prisoners in Victorian prisons was 6,522, an increase of 5% (303 prisoners) from 2015.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 138 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 134 in 2015.
  • Half (50% or 3,246 prisoners) of all prisoners had previously been imprisoned under sentence.
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (18% or 1,175 prisoners), followed by illicit drug offences (14% or 931 prisoners) and sexual assault (13% or 845 prisoners).

Queensland

  • The number of adult prisoners in Queensland prisons was 7,746, an increase of 6% (428 prisoners) from 2015.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 206 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 198 prisoners per 100,000 adult population in 2015.
  • Two-thirds (64% or 4,946 prisoners) of prisoners had previously been imprisoned under sentence.
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (22% or 1,730 prisoners) followed by unlawful entry with intent (14% or 1,085 prisoners).

South Australia

  • The number of adult prisoners in South Australian prisons was 2,948, an increase of 8% (216 prisoners) since 2015.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 219 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 204 prisoners per 100,000 adult population in 2015.
  • Half of all prisoners (50% or 1,468 prisoners) had previously been imprisoned under sentence.
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (18% or 534 prisoners), followed by sexual assault (13% or 374 prisoners) and offences against justice/government (12% or 350 prisoners). Of the 350 prisoners with an offence against justice/government, 195 were sentenced prisoners with an offence of breach of community based order.

Western Australia

  • The number of adult prisoners in Western Australian prisons was 6,329, an increase of 14% (774 prisoners) from 2015. This was the highest percentage increase in prisoners for all states and territories.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 314 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 278 prisoners per 100,000 adult population in 2015.
  • Three in five prisoners (60% or 3,783 prisoners) had previously been imprisoned under sentence.
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (20% or 1,258 prisoners), followed by unlawful entry with intent (16% or 1,037 prisoners) and illicit drug offences (13% or 800 prisoners).

Tasmania

  • The number of adult prisoners in Tasmanian prisons was 569, an increase of 10% (50 prisoners) from 2015.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 141 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 130 prisoners per 100,000 adult population in 2015.
  • Just over three in five prisoners (61% or 349 prisoners) had previously been imprisoned under sentence.
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (21% or 118 prisoners), followed by homicide (12% or 66 prisoners).

Australian Capital Territory

  • The number of adult prisoners in Australian Capital Territory prisons was 441, an increase of 11% (45 prisoners) from 2015.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 144 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 131 prisoners per 100,000 adult population in 2015.
  • Nearly three-quarters of prisoners (74% or 324 prisoners) had previously been imprisoned under sentence. This was the largest proportion of any state or territory (the national average was 56%).
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (27% or 120 prisoners), followed by sexual assault (12% or 51 prisoners).

Northern Territory

  • The number of adult prisoners in Northern Territory prisons was 1,666, an increase of 5% (73 prisoners) from 2015.
  • The adult imprisonment rate was 923 prisoners per 100,000 adult population, an increase from 885 prisoners per 100,000 adult population at 30 June 2015. The Northern Territory continues to have the highest imprisonment rate of any state or territory, with the national rate in 2016 averaging 208 prisoners per 100,000 adult population.
  • Seven in ten prisoners (72% or 1,194 prisoners) had previously been imprisoned under sentence.
  • The most common offence/charge was acts intended to cause injury (46% or 769 prisoners) followed by sexual assault (11% or 187 prisoners).

Looking at repeat offenders, we note that Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders have a disproportionately higher rate than non-indigenous categories, especially men.

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Although Australian prisoners make up around 79% of all inmates, “foreign born” prisoners by background show the following statistics. While Muslims represent around 2.2% of the Australian population, they represent around 14% of foreign born prisoners. Lebanon, Sudan and Iraq make up the largest components relative. Looking at the Asian population at 12% of total, they average around 25% of the foreign-born prison population. Vietnam, HK and China are the main perpetrators.  The ABS do not break down ethnicity of children born to migrants.

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It seems that physical assault, illicit drug and sexual offenses top most states and incarceration rates continue to rise in every state and territory.

In summary, while the numbers for both sentenced and unsentenced prisoners have continued to rise, the unsentenced population has grown at a faster rate.

Ten years ago, one in five prisoners was unsentenced, whereas now, the unsentenced population has grown to account for one third of all prisoners.

Over half (55 per cent) of all unsentenced prisoners had an offence of either acts intended to cause injury (29 per cent), illicit drug offences (15 per cent) or unlawful entry with intent (11 per cent).

One in four unsentenced prisoners identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.