Motorcycles

Harley has another Howler

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Harley-Davidson (HOG), perhaps the most iconic form of discretionary spending, came out with a howler set of Q4 numbers.  Revenue down 9% and operating losses in the last period. FY operating income fell 30% on revenues that finished 1% up. Domestic sales for the 2018 year fell 10% while international sales were flat. Worse was guidance pointed to unit sales falling between 217,000 & 222,000 units down from 228,000 in the fiscal year just past. This new range of unit targets would mean a decline for five consecutive years. If this pattern continues into 2020, luxury competitor BMW, which targets 200,000 units, will likely even up the tally, despite being less than half HOG was in FY2012.

Operating margin guidance for the motorcycle segment is forecast at 8-9% in 2019 down from 12% in 2017.

In June 2018, CM wrote, ““Harley-Davidson (HOG) is the classic case of a divine franchise. While still the world’s largest maker of cruiser motorcycles, it is being swamped by new competition. HOG’s EBIT performance has slid for the last 4 years and is even below the level of 2012…Sadly for HOG, 1Q 2018 has revealed even worse numbers. Global unit sales were 7.2% down on the previous year and 12% down at home.  Japan and Australia were soft. Looking at the strategy it looks like throwing spaghetti at a wall and hoping it sticks.

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Harley may have a grand master plan to incubate 2,000,000 new riders and launch 100 new bikes out to 2027, but all the while they remain stuck in a design studio, the competition, including the Japanese, keep stealing sales away from the Milwaukee icon.

The strategy looks completely unrealistic because growing 200,000 new bikers a year for a decade in the domestic market would mean that based on 2019 global unit sales projections,  92% of customers would need to be brand new, not repeat or existing. However the plan is to grow in the US where it had 138,000 sales in 2018 that would mean new customers would need to be 145% of all current sales in the US. No auto maker on the planet has ever had such pie in the sky assumptions for cultivating new customers, much less at that pace for 10 straight years. How can the board of HOG honestly think this is even remotely achievable? Sadly the company has been too eager conducting buybacks to flatter EPS. Net income for HOG was +1.8% for FY2018, diluted EPS was +5.6%. Time to stop playing games and properly delivering for shareholders.

Motorcycling reduces stress

According to a Harley-Davidson funded UCLA study, motorcycling reduces stress. The report findings were:

  • Riding a motorcycle decreased hormonal biomarkers of stress (cortisol) by 28%

  • On average, riding a motorcycle for 20 minutes increased participants’ heart rates by 11% and adrenaline levels by 27% —similar to light exercise

  • Sensory focus was enhanced while riding a motorcycle versus driving a car, an effect also observed in experienced meditators versus non-meditators

  • Changes in study participants’ brain activity while riding suggested an increase in alertness similar to drinking a cup of coffee.

CM already knew the benefits. Nice to have them confirmed.

KTM wins 18th straight Dakar

Aussie Toby Price has won the grueling 10-day Dakar endurance race in Peru overnight. Despite starting the race with a broken wrist, he still managed to overcome his disadvantage.

This chalks up Austrian brand KTM’s 18th consecutive victory. The manufacturer took 2nd and 3rd with its sister brand, Husqvarna taking 4th & 5th.

16yo Aussie Billy Van Eerde wins Asia Talent Cup Championship

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16yo Aussie, Billy Van Eerde, has won the Idemitsu Asia Talent Cup in Sepang in the final race of the year. He finished second in the race which should have meant he came second in the championship but his main  rival who won the race clattered into another rider earning him a 27 second penalty elevating BVE to first with the crown.

 

Sayonara Japan

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Today CM leaves Japan after 20 years. This was the first time I’d actively seen passport control beg me to keep my permanent residency. For 5 minutes she painstakingly asked her senior colleagues and tried to reason with me. My comment to her was “don’t worry, I’m not drunk” after repeatedly checking whether I was sure about the decision. She asked what were the reasons. “Where do I start?”

First of all I want to thank the Japanese for their custom, politeness and privilege to stay in their country. It has been truly amazing and life changing.

Sure the honest service drives one batty with its inflexibility but to those who whine about it can always choose to live somewhere else. Respecting a culture is true of any land one visits. Note to Western civilizations. It’s up to others to fit in with the host, not the other way around. Japan has this nailed.

What was the lasting memory of Japan? Simple really. The earthquake, nuke explosion  and tsunami of 2011. What it allowed was a clear cut look at a society that is so well bonded. People didn’t loot. Nor did they greedily hoard essentials. People just took what they needed. Had this been HK or anywhere else it would have been pandemonium. Keep calm and carry on typified Japan.

The lasting photo memory was during a motorcycle trip to MinamiSanriku. This image of a tsunami darkened Minnie Mouse sent chills down my spine. Staring up at the trees on the hillside, the leaves had turned purple because of the sea water which had risen almost 20 metres high. Car wrecks ragdolled in the rip. Windows smashed out of all levels of a 5 storey apartment block. Mother Nature was angry.

When my kids begged to go to Hawaii, they protested about my suggestion to see the devastation first hand. To see with their own eyes. Video and pictures do no justice, I told them. It turns out they appreciated the experience. I gave my younger daughter – then 7 years old – my camera because I wanted to capture images through her eyes. Amazing results.

There is too much to write about with 20 years under the belt.

As the sun sets in the land of the rising sun for me personally journey it shines brightly 9,000km south.

The next stage was a no brainer. So much for dealing with alpha types in finance, many of who’d sell their grandmother given half a chance. I’m overwhelmed with excitement about the prospects of saving the lives of people who know sacrifice and have protected our freedoms. The small team I will work with are as dedicated, hungry and inspired as I am.

My life needed a reboot. Sometimes there is a touch of Tom Cruise in Risky Business in our lives where we must make hard decisions and simply say, “what the f”

Writing this novel about my grandfather’s experiences in WW2 has inspired me to think of living life to the full. How most of us have got it so easy even though some pretend we’ve never had it so bad.

I will always have a soft spot for Japan. Handing back a permanent residency might seem mad in the overall scheme of things but it was the right decision. You can’t make a new start holding onto the past.

Sayonara Japan.

Ana Carrasco – first woman to win a motorcycle world championship

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21yo Spanish rider Ana Carrasco has become the first woman to win a world championship in motorcycle racing. She won the World Supersport 300s crown. If there was ever a better display of rising to a challenge in a sport dominated by males, this was it!

CM wrote in January about her first ever race win last year on equal machines with the boys. Shows that grit, determination and skill can make the difference without this recent desire to throw handicaps to even it out. Great job indeed to win on identical bikes. CM remembers seeing her in 2015 on the RBA Racing Moto3 bike in Motegi. Impressive.

We shouldn’t forget the performance of Michele Mouton who finished runner up in the 1982 World Rally Championship against an all male field with zero free kicks? She won four races in the season. Call it raw talent. She didn’t require complex formulas and spreadsheets to give her a handicap. She won on her own merits. Isn’t that the thrill of competition?

Yamaha’s MotoGP woes in stats

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Many in the MotoGP world are questioning the horrible performance of Yamaha in 2018. As it stands Yamaha holds no victories this year with a handful of races left in the season. This would equal its worst performance in 15 years.

Yamaha’s successes really started to trend much higher after hiring Honda legend Valentino Rossi (who took the 2001, 2002 & 2003 crowns for Honda). He subsequently took 2004 & 2005 crowns for Yamaha. After narrowly missing the 2006 title to Honda’s Nicky Hayden and losing to Aussie Casey Stoner in 2007 on a Ducati (the first title for the Italian maker) Rossi won for Yamaha in 2008 & 2009.

Yamaha won the championship again in 2010, 2012 & 2015 under Jorge Lorenzo. Honda won the 2011 with Stoner and the 2013, 2014, 2016 & 2017 titles under Marc Marquez who looks odds on to win 2018. At tonight’s Aragon GP in Spain, Yamaha’s four riders start 12th, 14th, 17th & 18th on the grid.

In August this year after the poor performance at the Austrian GP, Yamaha made the unprecedented motion of apologizing to its riders for having such a rubbish bike. The problem has continued for 18 months now. No doubt the developers in the team back in Iwata, Japan are still busy working out how to take responsibility instead of working to fix it.

The reality is that the other motorcycle teams have got much better. The Italians didn’t qualify for the recent Football World Cup and Germany was bailed out in the pool games. So Yamaha needs to stop resting on the laurels of having two world class riders with 10 championships between them to come up with a competitive product.

N.B. Suzuki withdrew from MotoGP in 2012 & 2013. Ducati entered MotoGP in 2003.