Blood seems thicker than water


18 months ago CM wrote on Theranos (which was set to rule the blood analysis world) saying its biggest problem was gaining trust – not of the company itself but the switching costs for medical professionals to use it. It turns out it was really about a lack of trust, not with doctors but investors. Theranos swindled $700m over three years from investors yet the punishment will be that its founder Elizabeth Holmes pays a $500,000 fine, return 18.9m shares and face a ban from public companies for 10 years after the SEC charged her with “massive” securities fraud. Why no jail? Allen Stanford received 110 years for his $7bn Ponzi scheme. Fraud is fraud. Shouldn’t 1/10th the fraud lead to 1/10th the jail time?  Enron’s former CEO Jeff Skilling was fined $45mn with the $11bn failure of the company. Seems like not all fraud was created equal in the eyes of the law.

A link between crime & IQ?


While updating all of the data for crime in Japan, CM was intrigued by the IQ test data compiled by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) for all 20,000 new inmates in 2016. The average IQ recorded was 81.4. All said and told, 57.4% of new inmates scored an IQ of more than 80. The MoJ also recorded that the level of education attained by criminals showed 62.5% had attained a maximum of middle school (years 7-9) or dropped out of high school (years 10-12).


Japan has a high school matriculation rate of around 95% which places it in the top 4 countries around the world. The US has around a 76% completion rate (rank 13) for high school according to the OECD.

To study IQ for inmates on a more global basis, a 2003 study by Ellis & Walsh revealed that of all the Texas inmates who entered the prison system in 2002 approx. 23% of the inmates scored below 80, almost 69% scored between 80 and 109, and only 9.6% scored above 110. The average was 85. The Prison Reform Trust in the UK said 1/3 of prisoners had an IQ less than 80 and one-third of that was less than 70. A Levine study in 2011 showed that those who had been to jail had a mean IQ of 89.61 while those who had not who had a mean IQ of 100.6.

Although a deeper look at serial killers showed extremely high IQs. The Dating Game serial killer Rodney Alcala had a reported IQ of 170. Uni-bomber Ted Kaczynski 167 and Jeffrey Dahmer 144. Hideo Murai, chief scientist of the Aum Shinrikyo (responsible for the Tokyo subway sarin attacks), was also reported t have an IQ of 160. On the other and, Australia’s worst mass murderer, Martin Bryant, reportedly has an IQ of only 68.

We shouldn’t forget that months after winning a national title, Harvard’s debate team lost to a group of New York prison inmates. A three-judge panel concluded that the jailbirds had raised arguments the Harvard team had failed to consider or was it a slight bias that the judges feared repercussions were they ever released?

Many prevailing theories of intelligence suggest people with lower IQs are most likely to break the law, since impulsivity, struggles at school and a lack of social bonding are all linked to criminality.  Although James Oleson, a criminologist based at the University of Auckland in NZ, suggests real-life geniuses have a penchant for breaking the law. He noted there may be an IQ threshold after which a high it becomes more of a risk factor for committing crimes. Intelligent offenders were more likely to get away with their crimes.

The flip-side to claiming mental disability is also that of avoiding execution. In the US, there are some states debating whether an inmate with an IQ below 70 cam be executed on the grounds he or she may not have sufficient mental faculty. Abandoning the 70-point IQ cutoff could double the number of death row inmates who claim they are mentally disabled.

According to the 2005 Annual Report on Government Measures for Persons with Disabilities published by the Japan Cabinet Office, of the total estimated 3,600,000 people with a mental disability, 459,000 people possessed the Certificate of Mental Retardation – 12% of all mentally disabled people in Japan possess it vs. 6.3% of mentally disabled inmates. The Yokohama National University suggested this clearly indicates a tendency that people who are bound to be in prisons are less likely to have possessed the certificate, therefore likely to have missed some form of assistance from social welfare programs.

Morie and Matsushi wrote, “5.9% of all population on average is categorized as intellectually disabled. However, the percentage of children who are classified as mentally disabled and receiving special education as well as social welfare is stagnant at 1%. Because the Certificate of Mental Retardation is only issued upon request, many of the parents/guardians are reluctant to apply due to the fear of being stigmatized. This is especially true for a mild case of mental retardation. Lack of appropriate education and opportunity to receive social welfare can lead the children with mental disability to anti-social behavior, ultimately connecting them to crimes. Therefore, guardians should be strongly recommended to apply for the certificate without hesitation…”

Although it is worth noting that despite prison capacity in Japan expanding 50% over the last decade, the number of inmates is 31% lower at around 56,000 or 62% capacity, down from 105% at the peak. Compared to the 2.2mn prisoners in the US, Japan is still at the very low end of the crime spectrum. That is to say the US has 13.1x the number of prisoners relative to the population than Japan. The US ranks 1st while Japan ranks 35th.

Teachers with guns – 44% of Americans support it. Texas already does it


A CBS Newspoll showed 44% of people (68% of Republicans, 47% of Independents & 20% of Democrats) were in favour of arming teachers at school. In some schools it already exists. This sign is from Argyle High School in Texas. The teachers pack heat. They are required to go through thorough background checks, training which simulates armed attackers and carry permits. Officials at Argyle and other districts in Texas say the policies deter shooters and provide peace of mind, and that other schools should follow their lead by allowing teachers to carry arms. In Texas, school boards must approve the arming of teachers. 170 districts allow employees and in some cases board members to carry firearms, according to the Texas Association of School Boards which equates to 22% of the state’s public school districts allow staff to carry guns, according to the Texas School Safety Center at Texas State University.

As foreign as the concept is to arm teachers , we must not forget that c.10% of schools in the US already have metal detectors to prevent weapons entering the classroom. Indeed a teacher being misidentified as a threat rather than a first responder by SWAT snipers because he or she was firing the weapon in a crisis is a real risk. Moreover many teachers just want to teach. If a student on a rampage knew certain teachers were locked and loaded perhaps they would make themselves initial targets. Surely teachers know this. Still we must assume any teacher bearing arms will do so willingly. Accepting an incentive bonus to do so is still an act of choice.

However it is worth considering that many schools (even schools in other countries) have armed guards at the gates. Schools are generally not fenced or walled in ways that allow singular access. Fire hazards would mean multiple entry/exit points are mandatory. So unless schools are prepared to put multiple guards at multiple access points, school safety will theoretically be compromised. So in order to protect school kids from the risk of future massacres, in the light of this strict adherence to the 2nd Amendment (despite the Democrats’ ability to amend it under Obama), solutions seem rather restricted to seemingly outlandish suggestions of arming teachers.

As written in earlier pieces, dealing with the cause of gun massacres is just as if not more important than outlawing guns themselves. The soaring incidence of broken homes, addiction to prescription drugs leading to narcotics abuse and antidepressants are elements of a decaying society. Merely banning weapons (as much as such programs have worked in Australia) won’t stop a growing problem of mentally unstable people who want to right their subjective view of injustices caused. The use of knives, bombs, cars or other means to perpetrate massacres will be found to replace guns. The other problem is that state laws are so different that navigating a common path is even more convoluted than calculus. Still, the idea that the media is pushing to say that arming teachers is widely rejected is patently untrue.

Premium Friday marks a year


12 months ago Premium Friday was initiated with much fanfare to get Japanese companies to push workers out the door with an early mark to encourage better work life balance from 3pm on the last Friday of each calendar month.

Unfortunately according to a survey conducted by METI, an average of only 11 percent of people said they were able to finish work early on the last 12 Premium Fridays. Only 22 percent of the about 1,130 companies that took steps to boost sales on Premium Fridays said they saw positive effects.

It is a good idea which would perhaps made better were individual companies to take the initiative to use the campaign on days that suited their business rather than sticking rigidly to a bureaucratic suggestion.

Midwives, check your white privilege


The Code of Conduct from the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia has some interesting clauses regarding nurses acknowledging our colonialist past and check our white privelege. Who knew that bringing people into the world requires nurses to undergo such PC nonsense and reeducation on something they do out of love and passion? What happened in all the child births to date that required professionals to pass identity criteria before ‘helping’? What if the selected midwife that ticks the boxes comes down with the flu and the patient goes into emergency labour due to an unforeseen complication? Does the baby’s life or the identity of the replacement midwife take priority? See below.

3.2 ​Culturally safe and respectful practice

Culturally safe and respectful practice requires having knowledge of how a midwife’s own culture, values, attitudes, assumptions and beliefs influence their interactions with women and families, the community and colleagues. To ensure culturally safe and respectful practice, midwives must:

a. understand that only the woman and/or her family can determine whether or not care is culturally safe and respectful.

b. respect diverse cultures, beliefs, gender identities, sexualities and experiences of women and others, including among team members.

c. acknowledge the social, economic, cultural, historic and behavioural factors influencing health, both at the individual, community and population levels.

d. adopt practices that respect diversity, avoid bias, discrimination and racism, and challenge belief based upon assumption (for example, based on gender, disability, race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, age or political beliefs).

e. support an inclusive environment for the safety and security of the individual woman and her family and/or significant others, and

f. create a positive, culturally safe work environment through role modelling, and supporting the rights, dignity and safety of others, including women and colleagues.

When my second daughter was born not for one second did the midwife’s identity play any role. Yet somehow we must now indoctrinate PC lunacy inside our hospitals. Surely safe deliveries are 100% of the mission. Not submitting to the whims of someone who subjectively sees themselves as something they’re not. Why can’t we just evaluate nurses on their abilities rather than search for ways to make them tick all the identity boxes to fit a structure that has not been required for millennia?

Japan healthcare ain’t so great as Occupy Dummycrats would have you believe


Japan’s healthcare system may seem great optically but it is heading for a crisis. Looking through the MHLW’s White Paper it is plain that the economic burden with an aging population is surging. Someone aged 65yo+ costs 12x what a 20yo costs in medical bills. By 2035 40% of Japan’s population will be aged over 65. Current medical costs total 41 trillion yen. Japan raises 97 trillion in revenue. 58% of that is tax. 40 trillion is raised in debt markets to fill the hole. EVERY YEAR.

80% of hospitals and clinics are private so it’s ridiculous to say 95% are not for profit. The current billing system encourages hospitals to keep patients in because they can charge for it. Hospitals don’t want it changed. Hospital clinics serve as gathering places for old people causing needless cost on a shrinking pool of taxpayers.

The MHLW admitted that around 40% of costs are labour related (doctors, nurses) around 25% on building maintenance, 15% on equipment and 10% on utilities. The only place they can conceivably cut is drugs where the push to genetics has been a factor.

Yes Japan’s healthcare system works for now but it can’t be sustained as it is without wholesale change. With a shrinking tax pool and aging population the dam will burst. Note the Ministry of Justice has had to ask for 6bn in extra funding for increased medical costs for an aging population inside its prisons where 65yo+ are the highest demographic.

Liberals are rarely good with numbers.

Healthcare in America – more hospitals going bankrupt

The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) is often lauded by some as noble legislation. Yet according to bankruptcy lawyers, Polsinelli, the changes made to reimbursements that used to help cover hospitals who treated uninsured patients were pulled under ACA and have sent many hospitals to the bankruptcy A&E ward. The law firm said in its report,

The Health Care Services Distress Research Index was 223.33 for the third quarter of 2017. The Health Care Distress Index increased 15 points from last quarter. The index has experienced record or near-record highs in 5 of the last 6 quarters. Compared with the same period one year ago, which was a record high at that time, the index has increased 60 points. Compared with the benchmark period of the fourth quarter of 2010, the index is up over 123 percent…Unlike the public markets, the Polsinelli/TrBK Distress Indices include both public and private companies, creating a broader economic view and one which may show developing trends on Main Street before they appear on Wall Street….Health care distress is high and it seems to be getting worse…

…The business of health care is unlike other industries, such as manufacturing, real estate, or retail. Health care faces all the traditional business challenges, such as competition, the impact of technology on services, and increasing wages. But more, the health care industry is needing to adapt to increasing regulations, changes in reimbursement rates from government or private payors, and a shift from traditional fee-for-service to value-based models that impact profitability…There is unprecedented pressure of major systemic changes to the existing health care system, particularly the implementation of the Affordable Care Act over the last several years and the current status of the program, which is alternately being repealed, repealed and replaced, phased out, or simply defunded…The administration’s recent decision to terminate cost sharing reduction payments will also directly impact the health care market. Insurance companies may continue to provide insurance at a higher premium or decide to exit the markets. Eliminating these payments and the resulting premium increases may increase the cost to the government through premium subsidies.”

In short many Americans saw a doubling of premiums (an average increase of 113%) under Obamacare inside of 4 years causing many to forgo the insurance. The reimbursements under the old system (which helped compensate hospitals administering emergency treatment for the uninsured) that were stopped on the proviso people would take up ACA plans backfired. Not enough people signed up and more hospitals running on a days cashflow have been forced to close because the reimbursements designed to protect them against uninsured patients disappeared. When Jonathan Gruber, the architect of Obamacare, testified to Congress he candidly said,

The Affordable Healthcare bill was written in a tortured way to make sure the (Congressional Budget Office) did not score the mandate as taxes…If CBO scored the mandate as taxes, the bill dies, OK? Lack of transparency is a huge political advantage … call it the stupidity of the American voter or whatever … that was really, really critical to get the thing to pass … I wish … we could make it transparent, but I’d rather have the law than not.”