86% of Americans agree in two parent households

A Rasmussen Reports online survey “finds that 86% of American Adults still think it is at least somewhat important for children to grow up in a home with both of their parents, including 61% who think it’s Very Important. Just 10% say growing up in a two-parent home is not important, including only three percent (3%) who say it’s Not At All Important.”

CM is reminded of a NY Times hit piece on racial bias in schools which overlooked the high correlation of single parent households, truancy, matriculation and troubles at school.Referring to the number of kids living with both parents/step-parent (according to a 2015 Pew Research Center study) in America we found:

Asian: 82%

White: 71%

Hispanic: 55%

Black: 31%

The GAO stats make clear that Asian kids get caught up in the least amount of disciplinary action both by absolute and percentage wise. Blacks the most, Hispanics second and whites 3rd. Could it be an inverse correlation?

Psychological studies have shown boys seem to be more impacted by the lack of a father in the house than do girls. Children (especially boys) raised by single mothers are more likely to fare worse on a number of dimensions, including their school achievement, their social and emotional development, their health and their success in the labor market. They are at greater risk of parental abuse and neglect (especially from live-in boyfriends who are not their biological fathers), more likely to become teen parents and less likely to graduate from high school or college.

survey taken by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in the US back in January of 1993 revealed poverty, alcoholism, student apathy and absenteeism were cited as big problems in secondary public schools. Lack of a parent was high on the agenda.

The American Psychological Association, “poor (bottom 20 percent of all family incomes) students were five times more likely to drop out of high school than high-income (top 20 percent of all family incomes) students…Family poverty is associated with a number of adverse conditions — high mobility and homelessness; hunger and food insecurity; parents who are in jail or absent; domestic violence; drug abuse and other problems — known as “toxic stressors” because they are severe, sustained and not buffered by supportive relationships…Community poverty also matters. Some neighborhoods, particularly those with high concentrations of African-Americans, are communities of concentrated disadvantage with extremely high levels of joblessness, family instability, poor health, substance abuse, poverty, welfare dependency and crime

Broken homes and poverty are undoubtedly a big issue. The report said, “Besides lack of parent involvement, the school problems viewed as serious by at least 10 percent of public school teachers included student apathy, poverty, student absenteeism, student disrespect for teachers, parental alcoholism and/or drug abuse, and student tardiness. Behaviors and attitudes of students were more likely to be seen as problematic by teachers at the secondary level than by teachers at the elementary level. Parent alcoholism, on the other hand, was described as “serious” as often by elementary teachers as by secondary teachers and poverty was described as “serious” more often by elementary teachers.”

85% of kids likely to go to college or higher levels of education came from stable family backgrounds. 61% of kids likely to drop out before graduating high school are from broken homes. Sixty One Percent!

Of course socio-economic factors impact these statistics too.

CM has no moral high ground to talk from as a divorced parent but there is no question stable parenting helps. 86% of Americans might agree with the benefits of two parents.

Note that divorce rates in the US have fallen from 4.8 per thousand people in 1992 to 2.9 in 2016.

Marriage rates have declined in the US but there is a higher propensity among millennials to stay together meaning fewer marriages aren’t converting to fewer divorces.

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